Special Needs Jungle has a new LinkedIn group!

LIgroupWe have exciting news!

Special Needs Jungle now has a brand new group on LinkedIn. While there are a couple of other SEN groups there, the Special Needs Jungle group is aimed at anyone on LinkedIn involved with 0-25yrs special needs and disability issues in the UK.

This includes health, education, mental health, social care, childhood illness/rare disease & its implications among other issues. And you are welcome whether you are a practitioner , parent/carer or another individual or professional with an involvement in these areas.

We aim to offer a chance to learn from each other by sharing knowledge, experiences, news, best practice and views you may not have previously considered!

There is so much knowledge available from many different sources and we’d like to offer a place for you to contribute your ideas, views, resources and knowledge.

With so many changes on the way in the wider area of special needs, it makes sense for knowledge to be disseminated and shared as widely as possible.

The group is managed by myself and Debs, so you’re sure to have a warm welcome. We’ll be on the look out for great contributions for the SNJ site as well, so don’t be shy in your suggestions!

Join, share, contribute, make yourselves at home!

If you are a LinkedIn user, you can ask to join here

Politics and personalities in the SEN jungle

Like me, my co-contributor, Debs Aspland, grew up in the call-a-spade-a-spade, working class, north-west of England.  Also like me, she has far too much to do trying to juggle work and care for her special needs children to have any time for the politics and game-playing that has so often, in the past, made lives difficult for parents trying to cut their way through the special needs jungle.

In this post, our Debs who, you will remember, is Director of Kent’s parent-carer forum, Kent PEPS, explores the different personalities we meet as parents and individuals in our daily lives and how thinking about this – and your own approach – can help you navigate the system to get the best help for your child.

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Any change, even a change for the better, is always accompanied by drawbacks and discomforts.

Arnold Bennett

Any change, even a change for the better, is always accompanied by politics and personalities.

Debs Aspland

True co-production with parents is a goal that came out of Aiming High.  The Department for Education allocate a small grant each year to a Parent-Carer Forum within each local authority, with the remit that they work with health, education, social care and other providers to ensure that the services they provide are the services that families want and need.  Fantastic, what a great way forward!

However, the DfE forgot to tell the health, education, social care and other providers that they had to work with the Parent-Carer Forums.

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Who will care for our vulnerable ‘Looked After Children’ in a care-less society?

There was a news report this morning about an investigation by MPs finding “serious weaknesses” in England’s care system that showed children’s homes failed to protect runaways.

Children’s Minister Tim Loughton said “urgent steps” would be taken. Much of the criticism by the all-party parliamentary groups on children in care and on runaways and missing people focuses on homes where about 5,000 of the 65,000 of those in care are looked after. The report, first highlighted by BBC Two’s Newsnight programme earlier this month, says the system of residential care is “not fit for purpose” for children who just disappear from the system.

It is very timely that this was mentioned this morning, following the Towards a Positive Future Conference that I spoke at at the weekend. I was going to write about my part in that that today, but it will have to wait because I want to tell you about one of the most disturbing things I have ever heard.

Another speaker at the conference was Child Psychologist and former headteacher, Charlie Mead. Charlie works with children from around 35 homes in the Midlands and the South West. In a talk entitled “The Care-less System” he told of how Looked After Children lose not only their families but also their voices. Many are not in school because schools won’t take them. Charlie said that service heads and agencies are unengaged, denying responsibility for what happens to these, our most vulnerable, young people.

Most have some kind of special need whether it is educational, emotional, social or behavioural. They do not have loving parents to fight for them. Many simply disappear and fall into the hands of drugs runners, sexual exploiters and ultimately, the criminal justice system. All because no one cared about them enough to give them a home, a school place or love of any description.

I will be bringing you Charlie’s speech in more detail in the next week or so, because it is vitally important that you read it. And not just read it, but do something to help these abandoned children who are living among us, invisible and ignored.

It is all our responsibility to help. Why should my children or your children have the best of what we can give them while these children are rejected through no fault of their own?

I really want to highlight this issue and want to call on you all to help me do this too.