Kilimanjaro Update – no casualties so far!

Tania writes…

A quick update on the 17 boys, all with some form of special needs, including my eldest, who’ve headed off from More House School in Frensham to climb Kilimanjaro and build facilities at their twin Shia School in Tanzania.

They’ve all arrived safely, are haggling and buying their own food and cooking for themselves, doing acclimatisation treks to prepare for the climb and even practising some Swahili. No casualties reported so far, though I am still worried that five pairs of pants for a month just isn’t going to cut it.

Below is from the front page of this week’s Surrey and Hants News by journalist Henry Ascoli who asked if he could focus more closely on Luca so that the readers would understand more about what a challenge it is for these boys in particular.

Fingers crossed they stay safe and I’ll let you know how they get on.

For me however, the challenge will be to get his younger brother into school for the rest of the week before Founder’s Day on Saturday, a morning that is always a test of endurance, high emotion and anticipation seeing which parents have deepest pockets to bid on the yearly auction (Hint: it won’t be us).

It’ll be hot, so I advise any new parent at our school to have fans, water and tissues (for joyful tears) at the ready, as the boys (all 400+ of them aged 7 to 18, except for those below) collect their end of year certificates and we laugh as Mr Yeoman pokes cruel, yet caring, fun of the sports teachers once again.

Kili

Children and Families Bill – the missing pieces

senreform2Earlier this month, we shared our Initial Views on the Children and Families Bill.  Since then, we have had chance to look at the Bill in more detail and wanted to share our views and more importantly to discuss “the missing pieces”.

As parents, we know the current system and its failings far too well so we welcomed the introduction of the Green Paper and the excitement of being involved in Pathfinders.  However, the Bill that we have been offered isn’t quite all that we were hoping for.

The reforms offered, “a new approach to special educational needs and disability that makes wide-ranging proposals to respond to the frustrations of children and young people, their families and the professionals who work with them”  and a vision of reforms to, ” improve outcomes for children and young people who are disabled or have SEN, minimise the adversarial nature of the system for families and maximise value for money”.

What we’ve been given in the Children and Families Bill has not quite lived up to the hype.

The good bits:

  • Children, young people and their families are to be true participants in all decisions affecting them
  • A duty for health, social care and education to commission jointly (which theoretically means they will actually speak to each other)
  • Education Health and Care Plans (EHCP) to be available up to the age of 25
  • Academies and Free Schools to have the same SEN requirements as maintained schools
  • Independent Special Schools will be included on the list of schools that parents can request as a placement (although the proviso about ‘efficient use of resources’ is still in there)

What’s missing?

  • Disabled children and young people without SEN.  Despite the Green Paper offering improved outcomes for children and young people who are disabled or have SEN, the Children and Families Bill is only offering the new EHCPs to those with SEN.  This decision shows a real lack of understanding from the DfE about the difficulties that children and young people with “just” a disability (and no SEN) face.  The Children and Families Bill suggests that the needs of these group will be met by the Local Offer.
  • Local Offer – Minimum Standards.  Currently, the DfE are suggesting a “common framework” for the Local Offer.  This could possibly (and will most probably) result in a postcode lottery.  As the Local Offer is being offered as the alternative to EHCPs, there needs to be much clearer legal obligation of minimum standards for Local Authorities.  “Minimum” indicates that something is the very least which could or should happen. “Framework” indicates a skeletal structure designed to support something.
  • There does not appear to be, within the Bill, a “duty to provide” the contents of the Local Offer, just to publish it and that a local authority “may” wish to review it “from time to time”. All a little bit wooly.
  • School Action/School Action +.  There is no mention within the Bill as to how the needs of children currently on SA/SA+ will be met.  Again, if the Local Offer is to be the alternative then this  needs to be much more prescriptive to Local Authorities. The DfE says the replacement structure for the present lower categories of SEN will be defined in the new Code of Practice which is now starting to be drawn up – interestingly by a different team of officials to the one that drafted the bill. Hmmm.
  • No duty on health or social care to provide the services within the EHCP – just an obligation to jointly commission with the local authority. There needs to be an realisation in government that the words “Joint Commissioning” aren’t a new magic spell – a sort of Abracadabra for SEN. Optimistically repeating the “Joint Commissioning” mantra doesn’t mean it’s, as if by magic, just going to happen.
  • No specified time frames from when you apply for an EHCP assessment to when you receive an assessment and more importantly, a EHCP.  Currently, it takes 26 weeks from applying for an Assessment of SEN to actually receiving a Statement of SEN.  This, as a parent, can seem like a lifetime (especially if you only hear about the need for a statement a short time before your child attends school – and yes, this is more common than people like to admit). However, you can see a light at the end of the tunnel with a deadline of 26 weeks.  The new Bill does not provide any defined time scales and this is essential for families. It does say that the regulations may make provision for this – but “may” should really be replaced with “must” as this is a key point.
  • Key worker – throughout the Green Paper, there was mention of a key worker for families.  One person to go to, who would help the families through the jungle but there is no mention of this within the Bill.  This is one of those key features that really excited a lot of families.  The ability to have one person; one person who would repeat your story for you and point you in the right direction to access the support your family needs. This is one aspect of the initial aspirational Green Paper that needs to be clarified – both for families and practitioners. Was this just an absent-minded omission from the Bill or has the DfE decided to quietly sweep this innovative and important role under the carpet? Note to DfE: if it’s the former, someone needs a slapped wrist, if it’s the latter, you’ve been rumbled so put it back in, pronto. Or is this another point for the “regulations”?
  • Time – the current Bill is scheduled for Royal Assent in Spring 2014 (i.e. passed into law) with September 2014 being proposed for when this will come into practice.  How will Local Authorities and PCTs manage to train all the necessary staff in this short time (especially with a 6/7 week school holiday in that time)? Ask any parent and they will say the same: they would far rather wait for another six months so that LAs can get all their recruiting and training in place (not to mention their funding arrangements) than inherit a chaotic mess where no one knows what’s going on, where the money is coming from and half the staff still hanging on to the old adversarial ethos.

While we’re on the subject of culture change, a DfE official did mention to us that he thought re-training to effect culture change should be starting now. I would be really interested to know what funding or provisions or courses there are in existence or planned, to begin this process – which is arguably one of the most important parts of the entire process. Indeed, it might be a little controversial to suggest, but if a root and branch programme of culture change within LA SEN departments had been put into practice to start with, there may have been less need to overhaul the entire system.

The new Children and Families Bill does have the potential to provide children and families with, “A new approach to special educational needs and disability” and to, ” improve outcomes for children and young people who are disabled or have SEN, minimise the adversarial nature of the system for families and maximise value for money” but not without some more thought and considerable tweaking.

Tania & Debs

Son1 is 15 today-and proof that the right support can work miracles

Today is the International Day for Persons With Disabilities, which will be marked worldwide. It’s also Son1’s 15th birthday and I would like, today, to offer a message of hope for parents of children with behavioural problems and Asperger’s who are worrying what the future may hold for their children.

Son1 - All rights reserved

Aged 7

When Son1 started school, we already knew that it was not going to be an easy ride. Fiercely intelligent and sporty with a bright blonde mop of hair, we still hoped for the best. At pre-school, the undertrained staff had already shaken their heads at his unwillingness to go along with everyone else. If he couldn’t have the colour cup he wanted, he would rather not have the drink. He would tear around, regardless of who was around him.

Within the first few terms of reception, he had a behavioural chart. He couldn’t bear to be anything but first in the queue and if something went wrong, he would sit under the table and refuse to move. He found it impossible to see others’ point of view; on outings he was a danger to himself. Making and keeping friends was another issue. Needless to say, this all had an impact on his learning.

He loved football but would often sulk on the sidelines if he couldn’t play where he wanted. At home he would have rages, was often uncontrollable and nothing we did seemed to make any difference.

Needless to say, we were drained, stressed and desperate to help him. I even helped in school twice a week to make sure I knew what was going on there. My husband became a team football coach – something he still does – to support him.

So, lacking any useful help or advice from school, I got wise, did my research, got a referral to a paediatrician and discovered what the problem was – Asperger’s with Hyperactivity. I worked really hard to get him the statement he needed to support his social and emotional needs. We tried and discounted medication; we tried a different diet. This was against a backdrop of having a younger son with medical, social and educational needs for whom we also had to find a solution.

And find it we did.

For the last five years, as you may know, both our boys have been at the most fantastic independent specialist school that is designed for bright boys who find it difficult to learn in a mainstream setting. They may have dyslexia, dyspraxia, increasingly Asperger’s or another learning difficulty. Schools like this are few and far between and, as far as I know, there is no comparable girls’ school. We even moved house to be closer for the daily school run.

Son1, now he has been getting the right education in the right environment, is growing into an independent, clever, thoughtful young man. He has a love of, and a talent for music. He has a sense of humour. He still has his impulsiveness and stubbornness but he listens to reason – as long as you don’t ram it down his throat. Best of all, he has friends.

Some of this is down to growing up in a stable home with a family who work hard to make sure that he has what he needs – which is not always the same as what he wants. But mostly it’s the intensive input and care from the experts in the Learning and Development Centre at school

Son2 winning Chairman's Player of the Year for 2012

Son2 winning Chairman’s Player of the Year for 2012

I’m telling you this because I know very well that there are parents reading with younger children who are still at the ‘before’ stage. Who may be wondering where to turn, who can help them or if their child will ever have the kind of life they had envisaged for them. They will have faced disapproving looks from parents at the school gates and from teachers who are not trained in either recognising or supporting this type of child.

On this Day of Disabilities, I also think of those children with such severe difficulties that they may never reach adulthood, or who will be dependent on their parents or on medical care for as long as they are alive. And I realise that we are lucky. Our younger son does have medical difficulties that we have been struggling to get to grips with and this is hard, with an uncertain future, but we have experience enough now to know that we will cope.

This is not to say that some have it worse so you can’t feel bad – no one can tell you how to feel and when we see our children suffering it is devastating, whatever their condition.

But for boys like Son1, there is a solution. It takes lots of work, determination, strength and persistence – for them, you and their school. As further proof, this year at his football club, he won the Chairman’s Player of the Year Award. He played in goal for two seasons to benefit the club, even though he prefers being a striker.

My message to you is do not give up. Keep looking until you find the right solution. Get educated, get help – for your child and for yourself – but above all, believe that the future will be better.

August’s top bank holiday SEND stories

After a two week break, the Special Needs Jungle weekly curation of the best of special needs posts is BACK! I’ve tried to include stories I tweeted while I was away in Italy being subjected to torture by invisible mosquitos. My top holiday tip if you have teenagers like mine is to make sure your holiday home comes equipped with free wifi for those inevitable downtimes, so you are never plagues with cried of, “I’m bored!”

My boys still have another two weeks and a bit weeks off, and I intend to spend some of it taking them to our new gym, as I’m fed up of us all being locked in our little corners of the house on our respective computers (though at least I’m doing actual work). The gym is brilliant with a huge pool and great facilities, including a spa (for me, obviously) and, of course, free-wifi so that Son2 can sit pedalling the cycle machine while playing on his iPad. Well, it’s a start and a compromise, but at least part of him is moving.

Have a fab August bank holiday weekend and fingers crossed for good weather if you’re planning a barbecue or a last dash away! Next week – the paralympics!

Free dyslexia webinars for back-to-school students

A free four part webinar series Academic Success & Dyslexia: Back To School Webinar Series!is starting on 23rd August aimed at helping dyslexic students succeed when they head back to school in a few weeks

It’s being run by Patrick Wilson, who has been working with dyslexic students since 2003. A dyslexic himself, he founded the Tutor Crowd to help SEN students do better in exams. His particular teaching focus is dyslexia.

Patrick believes that low achievement is not the result of low ability it is the result of ineffective learning. He has developed a specific way of teaching dyslexic students that aims to help them work more effectively. He has previously been featured in The Times and The Daily Mail.

Today, he tells Special Needs Jungle about his service.

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I got involved with tutoring SEN students because of my background as a dyslexic. In education I found I was constantly coming up against brick walls, and in order to get through school and university, I created techniques and learning models to get the grades. It’s been a natural progression for me to pass on what worked to other dyslexics. I’ve had some great successes with SEN students and it’s good to see people who have struggled academically start achieving.

What’s important for SEN tutors is that they fully understand the student’s SEN. I think that knowledge can sometimes be easier for a teacher with personal experience of the issue to communicate. What I feel happens a lot in SEN teaching, is that lessons focus on the correct objectives, things like organising and structuring. However, if the teacher hasn’t truly understood the students SEN in the first place, the student will walk away without having achieved or learned anything.

I use a lot of different methods when I’m tutoring. I’m an advocate of action based learning for dyslexics, and I focus on creating a relaxing stress free environment, where mistakes are seen as a good thing. I also recommend providing a constant feedback loop for students. Very often a dyslexic will put a huge amount of effort into a project, only to be told at the end that it is not right. That is disheartening and can potentially put the student off learning permanently. By providing constant feedback, the student can improve bit by bit without becoming disheartened.

My advice for worried parents is to do your research. It’s really important you get up to speed with the specific SEN issue that your child has. Understanding should allow you to work with your child more effectively and reduce the emotional issues that can occur in a parent- ‘SEN child’ relationship.

The Tutor Crowd is an online platform that connects you to great tutors. Instead of only being able to work with local tutors, you can work with a tutor from anywhere in the country. For example, you may need an economics tutor that specialises in dyslexia. Our platform gives you the opportunity to find a tutor that’s an ideal match for you. We also have very strict entry criteria for tutors. Only the very best tutors are allowed on the site. We also use a rating and feedback system so parents can have complete confidence that a tutor is top quality.

The webinar is a free 4 part series about understanding and working with your dyslexia. It’s for anyone with dyslexia who wants to achieve academically, as well as for parents and educators who want to engage, teach and build better relationships with their child or student. Click here to register.

Dyslexia in the wrong situation can be a soul destroying problem. However, in the right circumstances, and with the right learning techniques, dyslexia can be an incredible asset and a very powerful way of thinking.

When the words move by themselves – it could be Visual Stress

I met a lady on Twitter a while back, Michelle Doyle, who was talking about ‘Visual Stress’. I wasn’t really clear about what this was so Michelle has kindly written about it for Special Needs Jungle about how it affects her son and her fight to get him the support he needs. Here’s her story:

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After years with my son struggling with his reading and writing and being given the impression that he was lazy in class, in Nov 2009 at the age of eleven, he was given a coloured overlay by a teacher at his Primary School.

After I questioned him about this, I was shocked and extremely surprised to find out that when he looked at a page of writing it moved around the page. My son has Visual Stress, the movement of letters on a page of writing and there is a fairly long list of symptons that are associated with it.

I spoke to his Optician who confirmed that my son has Visual Stress, Visual Stress – Meares Irlene Syndrome, Scotopic Sensitivity Syndrome, or Visual Dyslexia the different names I have heard it called. He has to have two pairs of glasses one for everyday use, i.e. going out  and a coloured pair for his educational needs.  He also has severe long-sightedness.

Precision-tinted Lenses are only available by private prescription and the cost can vary from area to area by quite a considerable amount.

I got in touch with the local Primary Care Trust and after about 6 months I finally managed to get a second voucher issued for his distance vision to be put into his tinted lenses. This is also now done for all the children in my area who suffer from Visual Stress.

I have also been in touch with my MP.   She wrote to the Secretary of State for Health and the Chief Executive for NHS in my area.  The replies basically told me what I already knew about the vouchers for children etc. I do not feel that the question of extra funding for the vision of these children was answered at all.   Basically I felt as though i was being swept under the carpet.  [Currently vouchers will not cover the cost of tinted lenses – only the prescription lense]

My MP wrote to the Group Director for Social Care and Learning. His reply gave me the impression that he didn’t have a clue what I was talking about. I then sent an e-mail direct to the Group Director of Social Care and Learning, begging of him to do his homework and find out more about this condition. I sent him two examples of Visual Stress so he could see for himself the reason’s behind these children struggling so much with reading and writing.   Once again I received a reply stating what I already knew, with no offer of looking into this more.

I also got in touch with the Education Dept. for Disabled Children.  They then referred me to The Visual Impairment Coordinator for my area. She told me herself that what my son had wrong with his eyes is not dyslexia. She described it as Scotopic Sensitivity Syndrome or Visual Stress. Even she had to research Visual Stress before she got back to me.   She told me not to force my son to read as the stress he feels, makes the stress on his eyes worse and therefore the Visual Stress symptoms get worse.

When my son first started year 7 he had a reading age of 7.2 years even thought he was 11 years of age. Now at 13 years and year 8 he has the reading age of 9.5 years. [this is an amazing achievement!] I was told by my son’s school that the Education Authority in my area would not issue my son with a Statement of Educational Needs.   So I went directly to the Head of SenCo in my area.  I told them that he needed and I wanted him to have a Statement of Educational Needs.  He was assessed and It took approximately three months for him to be issued with a Statement.

The school were very surprised that I had managed to get a Statement for him.

I was told that my son also had dyslexic tendencies I asked the school about getting him assessed; they told me that my Education Authority didn’t recognise Dyslexia as a learning disability. I told them that I wanted him assessed. Strange that if my son goes to College or University all of his sight problems will then be recognised.

In the mean time I have started a group on Facebook called Parents of Kids with Visual Stress.   This is where all our members can discuss the problems that they are having and also get ideas of how to tackle things from other people. We are also there to support each other with our fight.

I also have an e-petition running for the funding of tinted lenses for visual stress.   I need to get 100,000 signatures for it to be discussed in Parliament. The more votes that we can get the quicker the help can be put in place to help our children.

So far it has felt as though I am being pushed around an ever increasing system of managers etc.  Yet not one of these people are able to tell me if my son can get any help towards funding the glasses he so obviously needs. Without these tinted lenses my son will never be able to read and write at the same level as his peers.

Catch up on some fab Special Needs news and blogs from this week

So, later today I am heading out for the BritMums bloggers conference and awards. As you know, Special Needs Jungle is a finalist in the ‘Change’ category. As something of a niche subject, I’m really not expecting to win – reaching the finals, thanks to all your votes, was such a brilliant feeling to know that you like the blog enough to make the effort to vote and I’m very grateful to everyone who did. If you’re going to the conference, please say hello to me!

Last week’s SEN conference has given me lots of material for posts – and I’m not finished yet. Next week I’ll be bringing you a large chunk of Charlie Mead’s talk about the state of care for Looked after Children. It’s something we should all care about. Also, if you haven’t already seen it, check out my post (below) about when we went to see Temple Grandin speak and my view on the SEN pathfinder so far and why I think the timetable is still too rushed.

Have a great weekend – may the sun peek out on us at some point!

 

The week’s scoop on special needs and disability stories

Today (Friday) is a day full of SEN green paper meetings for the Surrey pathfinder for me and tomorrow it’s the long-awaited Towards a Positive Future SEN conference for which there are still a few bursary places available for parents.

All that’s left is to choose what to wear – and as I’m not very good at this sort of thing, it’ll probably be the most challenging part of the whole thing. Next week I’ll be at the finals for the BritMums Brilliance in Blogging Awards for which Special Needs Jungle is a finalist, so I expect you’ll find me searching the rails at the Posh Dress designer exchange shop in Farnham where they always seem to have the right thing that actually fits me.

Family wise we’ve had a week of CAMHS & cardiology visits for Son2. The consultant paediatrician spent the CAMHS session yawning and answering his phone, but at least the psychologist was sensitive and attentive and we had a satisfactory outcome, although the six month wait left a lot to be desired.

So, on to the week’s stories. Check out, if you haven’t seen it, the Pathological Demand Avoidance article by Deborah Rourke – it’s had hundreds of views this week and is well worth a read. Also have a look at my post about Son2’s raspberry Pi computer. The Padawan has become a Jedi…

Have a great weekend and don’t let the weather spoil it!

SEN child? Join me and NAS president, Jane Asher, on Sat 16 June

So, it’s just a couple of days before the Towards a Positive Future Special Educational Needs conference in Newbury – if you can make it at all, it’ll be well worth the trip.

My presentation is all written and it includes some up to date information on the pathfinder trials for the SEN Green Paper for Surrey. What I’ve found is that those commentators outside the pathfinder really know little about what is actually happening within the workstreams.

Tomorrow, I’m off to a couple of meetings for the Surrey pathfinder, including the latest for the Education, Health & Care plan. We’ll be reviewing a draft plan drawn up by the pathfinder lead, Susie Campbell who has collated lots of feedback from a previous meeting – quite an undertaking and I’m looking forward to seeing what she’s come up with. Our feedback from Family Voice Surrey parent-carer forum was quite comprehensive.

Saturday’s conference still has a few paces left and they can be boked online at http://www.wordswell.co.uk/tapf-conference-2012/booking.php

Among the keynote speakers are:

Clive Rawlings – Barrister – The Coalition Plan for Special Educational Needs: Cohesion or Corrosion?

Charlie Mead – Educational Psychologist – The Careless System

Martyn Sibley – Social Entrepreneur who has one aim ‘To Change the World for Disabled People’

Jane Asher – Actress and President of the National Autistic Society

Delegates can also choose from a range of seminars including OT- Equipping young people with SEN and parents for Life After School; Differentiation in the classroom for children with autism; SLT – the SCAEP multi-sensory social communication skills programme;  Getting Good Social Work Services; Implications of the Green Paper for Children with Dyslexia and Developing Communication Skills for Pupils with Down’s Syndrome.

I’m really looking forward to meeting Debs Aspland, the chair of Kent parent-carer forum, who’s delivering a presentation drawn from her experience as parent of a child with a diagnosis. We’ve built up a friendship via twitter and Facebook and narrowly missed meeting at the Labour SEN policy review meeting a few months ago. Social media is fab for making connections like this, especially as a parent of children with special needs, which can be socially isolating.

So, really hope to see you there if you can make it. And if you do, don’t be shy and make sure you come up and say hello!

Advocates For Children – a FREE SEN legal advocacy charity.

The world of special needs is, I have discovered, populated with extraordinary people  – both those who care and do their best for their children and professionals who go the extra mile to provide whatever help they can.

One such lady is Gloria Vessel, a barrister who has for many years carried out pro bono work for families affected by disabilities and SEN. In a decade of helping families at the SEN Tribunal, Gloria has never lost a case.  However, it became clear that she could not take on all the children whose parents were asking for her help so she founded the charity, Advocates for Children. Today, Gloria has written about the charity and its work exclusively for Special Needs Jungle.

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For parents of children with disabilities it really is a jungle out there, especially when it comes to getting the right school, or the right schooling for your child. Parents are faced with a bewildering mass of Codes of Practice, deadlines, and the ever present prospect of having to take your case to a Special Educational Needs Tribunal. Advocates for Children is here to help.  We are a relatively new charity; only three years old.  Our volunteer Advocates help children with disabilities and life-limiting conditions aged 4 – 16 with problems at school.  Our services are free.

Advocates For ChildrenProblems we deal with include getting the right educational support for a child at school, getting the right school for the child,  giving parents advice on where they are going with their child’s case, or addressing the issues of bullying or abuse of children. We believe that when you are helping children one size does not fit all.  No two cases are ever the same, and we know that every child and every family are unique, so we devise help to fit the needs of each family and each child.

Your child is never just a case number to us.  Your child is a unique and special individual that we are privileged to advocate for. It is our policy to see each child that we Advocate for, so that we know best how to help them.  Our central focus is always what is best for the child. We also give advice to parents over the telephone, where they simply have a query that they need some help with.

For many parents we can resolve a problem with one call. If parents want to be legally represented, we can help you to find the right solicitor, and to advise you on what you need to do.  In certain circumstances, we would represent our own clients at a Special Educational Needs Tribunal, however we try as hard as we can to avoid a Tribunal if that is possible. The law is a vital tool for parents to be able to get help for their child, but we urge parents not to see it as a first resort, or as the only resort. So often parents will ring asking about Tribunals, or they are even be on their way to Tribunal, without ever having been told, or having been able to find out, what they actually need to do to give themselves the best chance of success at a Tribunal, or even understanding exactly what is involved.  That is a dangerous position to be in.  Knowledge is power, so we help to give you that knowledge.

It is also amazing how many parents have been told that they need to go to Tribunal without ever having really met with the Local Education Authority to discuss their child’s case.  We can review a case and see where there are areas of agreement, as well as disagreement, and see if a solution can be arrived at by negotiation and not by immediate legal action.  That benefits both sides and benefits the child.  And, if it comes to a Tribunal, the parents will be much better prepared, and will know what they need to focus on.  It really is good to talk! A Tribunal is a legal procedure and the evidence you put forward is vital to your case.  We advise you on what the evidence is that you need.  You know your child inside out, but a Tribunal Panel does not.  They have to decide on what your child is all about by the written evidence in front of them.  So, you need your written evidence to help you make your case.  Of course you can talk about your child, but you need written evidence too.

As a barrister I have the greatest respect for and faith in the legal process, but I also know that the better informed parents are the better equipped they are to make all-important decisions for their children before that process begins. Advocates for Children believes in the dignity of the child.  We champion the legal and human rights of the children we Advocate for and our watchwords are ‘Listen, Respect, Care’. Our Trustees are all Mums and Grandmums who really understand what our clients are facing and that is what we feel is our greatest strength, as it drives all that we do for these special children. Our Mission Statement is; To enable children with disabilities to have the opportunity to fulfil their true potential and have their chance to shine. We are proud to do just that.

http://advocatesforchildren.org.uk/

Common sense solutions to solving dyslexia issues

Last week, while reading my SEN news feeds, I came across an article about dyslexia on the Conservative Home website by education expert, John Bald. John is a former OFTSED inspector and contributor to The Guardian. He has almost forty years’ experience of teaching people of all ages to read and write, to learn foreign languages and to understand and use arithmetic.

I got in touch with John and asked if he would mind setting out his ideas in an article for Special Needs Jungle readers. He very kindly obliged – and I think you will find it extremely interesting reading:

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Tania’s request seemed simple – she had read a posting dealing with literacy problems on another site, which set out to explain what I described as “the dyslexia racket”. Could I write a straightforward guide for parents on what to do if their child has a problem?

For some issues, the answer is, “Yes”. If the problem concerns literacy, and does not reflect a serious general learning difficulty, bring your son or daughter to see me, and I will fix it for you without charge. This is a big claim, but I deliver on it, time after time, because I know the mental processes involved in reading, and the regular and irregular features of English spelling like the back of my hand. As we read, we use the information contained in letters to do several things at once. We identify words by tracking print closely with our eyes – the latest tracking devices show eye movements following print, as well as changing their fixing point on the page. As we do so put them together into phrases, to reproduce the intonations of the language and reconstruct the sense indicated by the author.

John Bald

The process is a little like reading music. Phonics, the relationship between words and sounds, is at the heart of it, but, unlike musical notation, they are not always reliable, so we have to learn what the letters are telling us in an individual word. For example, the a sound in can has to be stretched to say can’t, and the letters don’t tell us this, any more than they tell us the difference between do and don’t. Once we’ve learned to use what the letters tell us, without supposing that they tell us everything, we understand that the language is a human construct, with human failings, and that it does always respond to strict logic.

As I say to children, English is roughly a thousand years old, and if we were a thousand years old, we’d have a few wrinkles. Much of the difficulty many people experience with reading in English arises because teachers do not know the wrinkles. It’s not their fault – no-one has pointed these out in their training. The reason I came to know them myself was that I did a degree in French, which is the source of over half of the problems. Say table in French and you will hear that l comes before e. It’s phonics, but French phonics. William the Conqueror’s invasion in 1066 left us with a lot more than castles!

How we put words together in phrases and sentences is also a bit like music, and I only understood this last year, when I read the French government’s national curriculum for learning English. It points out that, except for very short words, one part of each word is almost always picked out for stress. Again, the letters won’t tell us what this is – we have to know it, and it is not even the same in words of the same family – photograph, photographer, photography. The last straw for foreign learners is that we pick out one word in each phrase or sentence for extra stress on its own, usually without even knowing that we do it. Controlling these patterns of stress in real time requires very detailed knowledge of the language, and is one reason why so few foreign speakers of English have no detectable accent.

So, if someone comes to me with a reading problem, I explain this and we practise. First, though, I have them read to me, and ask myself two questions:

1. What is it in this person’s thinking that is preventing them from reading?

and

2. How do I help them adjust their thinking so that they can read?

These questions focus my mind on the person I’m working with, and not on some theory – my own or anyone else’s. We need to tune into print, and to help people do this, we need to know the causes of interference. The most common are guessing at words, usually from their first letter, not seeing clearly – some people are sensitive to certain wavelengths of light in a way that only becomes clear when they have to apply their eyes to the tightly disciplined activity of reading – and not hearing clearly, sometimes because of misconceptions developed in early childhood through conditions such as glue ear. Teachers should know all about these things. Alas, most don’t. So, if your child has a problem with literacy, take him or her to someone who does.

I use a similar approach to spelling , Slimmed Down Spelling, but that is for another posting. An account is at http://johnbald.typepad.com/language/2009/06/slimmed-down-spelling-and-government-nonsense.html. I am currently working on maths.

But what if the problem is not with reading, spelling or arithmetic? What if it is a behavioural issue, Asperger’s or Autism? The truth here, I think, is that our knowledge of these issues is not far advanced from that of our general knowledge of science in the seventeenth century. We can see things that we can’t fully explain, and our attempts to solve problems are therefore not fully effective. Even respected scientists such as Simon Baron Cohen resort to blatant speculation, such as his idea that autism is the “extreme male brain” when the evidence runs out.

But I still come back to my two questions, perhaps extended. What is it that is making this person angry, or anti-social? What is it that they need to understand and don’t, and how do we make it clear to them? We know of successful techniques such as social stories to help children focus attention on other people as well as themselves or, more recently, of practising telling the time quickly in order to focus attention on detail. One thing I can say, from extensive experience, is that anger and poor behaviour often arise from children’s frustration at not being able to do their work, and in some extreme cases because of the effect of sensitivity to light that is not identified because no one is looking for it. If the issue that is causing concern is anger, however it is expressed, then if we are to tackle it, we need to move beyond our concern with managing the anger, find out what is causing it, and do what we can to remove the cause.

Find John’s blog and contact details here: http://johnbald.typepad.com/

Special needs news you can use from the last week

Aah, the boys finally returned to school mid-week. They’ve been off so long I’d almost forgotten the way there. I’m not sure which I prefer – the peace and quiet of working undisturbed by regular requests for food against the lack of need to do the stressful school run…

There have been three SNJ posts this week, including Son2 in his fetching lycra Body Sox (see link below), as well as lots of interesting special needs news stories. Check them out below. And, if you haven’t voted for Special Needs Jungle in the BritMums awards yet (see link badge upper left), there’s still time. You know it makes sense.

TGIF: And a chance to see the week’s special needs news & views

Tania TirraoroThis week we’ve had sunshine, showers, hail as big as marbles and thunder and lightning… it must be April. I’ve whipped up some special needs stories and blogs that might have slipped your notice as you get over all that Easter chocolate.

As you read this over the weekend, I’ll be at a spa hotel with my husband, enjoying our carer’s break, leaving the boys and the dog in the capable hands of my mother-in-law. Have been instructed to leave my iPad behind and relax… if you spot me online before Monday, please tell me to log off immediately.

Cracking special needs stories for the Easter weekend

Happy Easter! Why not spend a few minutes this long weekend to catch up on some of the past week’s special needs and disability stories?

Here’s my pick:

Got one of your own not listed? Why not add it in the comments…

What’s been said about special needs on the web this week

Friday’s come around again – this one marks the day my boys break up for Easter and don’t go back until April 18th. Son1 is on a WWI trip to Ypres, Son2 off sick with painful legs caused by Vitamin D deficiency, so their holidays have already started. My task – get Son2 out of the Technolair and into the sunshine, which is easier said than done.

While I’m doing that, have a look at these stories and blogs I found (or wrote myself) in the past week. Lots of good stuff. If I missed your great blog post or news story, leave it in the comments and I can add you to my RSS feeds.

Catch up with the best special needs blogs and news from this week

So many autism, Asperger’s, dyslexia, ADHD and other special needs stories this week. This is my pick of the best of the blogs, news and research.

If you enjoy reading Special Needs Jungle, I would be really happy if you would please nominate SpecialNeedsJungle.com blog in BritMums Blogging Awards in the CHANGE! section

Enjoy this week’s story selection. Don’t forget, if you have your own post or story, add it in the blog comments section.

Conference for parents of children with special educational needs and professionals

National Autistic Society president, Jane Asher, will be speaking at a conference in Newbury, Berkshire, in June for parents of children with SEN and associated professionals. The agenda will be published soon but the flyer is below and a downloadable pdf version is at the bottom.

Towards_a_Positive_Future_Conference_2012_flyer – Download as PDF

 

Want your SEN product or service listed on the Special Needs Jungle site?

Special Needs Jungle has lots of visitors every day ranging from parents & carers to SEN professionals. It has many email subscribers and is also available for subscription on Kindle.

The site has a page where links to SEN sites and resources are listed. If you would like to have your SEN resource or product listed, please use the contact form to get in touch.

This service is free for parent support groups and SEN/Disability charities. For other companies, there is a £20 a year donation fee that will go to More House Special School in Farnham for its fund to build a School of Engineering.

More House School educates boys from 8 to 18 who might be bright but who have some form of learning difficulty that impedes their progress in mainstream school.

If you know of a company who might be interested in taking advantage of this offer, please forward this link to them.

What did you miss? Special Needs stories from the last week

It’s a bumper round-up of special needs stories and blogs this week – check out what you might have missed:

Got one of your own? Add it in the blog comments.

TOTS 100 - UK Parent Blogs
familyholidays.co.uk

SEN stories in the past week

Interesting special needs stories from the last week. If you have one I missed, leave it in the comments!

Get the Special Needs Jungle Blog delivered to your Kindle

I’m delighted to announce that Special Needs Jungle is now available as a Kindle Blog subscription. For just 99p a month you can have every post delivered wirelessly to your Kindle or Kindle app so that you can read it offline whenever you want, even if you’re not near your computer.

It means you’re always connected to important SEN news, views and information as well as guest posts from interesting contributors.

If you’re Kindle enabled, whether it’s through a Kindle, ipad or smartphone app, subscribe from the links below:

UK:

 

 

US:

Which learning resources help SEN kids? Take this survey

Ann Beck, of  The Gift of Learning has asked me to help get her message out about a survey  she’s devised to assess what kind of learning resources SEN children need. See below for details and a link to the survey
“Can you help me to help your child learn?
I have recently started a new business venture with a view to supplying learning resources to parents of children with special educational needs.  As a mum I found it difficult to find affordable resources to help my own son who is dyslexic and suffers from anxiety and so ‘The Gift of Learning’ was born (www.thegiftoflearning.co.uk) .
I’m currently researching which areas of education parents feel they need the most help with and what better way than to ask you directly?  I value your opinions and hope that you can spare me a couple of minutes to answer 4 short questions.
If you’d like to help follow this link http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/8VRRDNG
Thank you!

Special Educational Needs stories of the week

This will be the last one of the year as i take a break and concentrate on my boys for Christmas. Have a great Christmas. If you do something different to accommodate the needs of your child, would love to hear about how you manage with the festive season.

Don’t forget my Christmas Giveaway – you just have to go to www.facebook.com/specialneedsjungle and ‘like’ it and you’ll be entered in the draw for a copy of my SEN book, Getting started with Statements – even if you don’t need it yourself, you may know someone who does.  If you already like the page, just leave a comment asking to be entered.

What do parents of a newly-diagnosed child need?

I recently attended the launch of Family Voice Surrey, the new local forum for parents and carers of children with SEN and disabilities in Surrey. It’s part of the National Network of Parent Carer Forums and aims to give Surrey parents a voice in the policy and decision making process for disability and SEN services.

As part of the table discussions we were asked to identify the top three challenges facing families with children with disabilities and SEN in the county. When each table’s facilitator stood up in turn and read out their lists, almost every table had identified the same issue – information and support after diagnosis.

Everyone agreed that was is needed is an independent support worker who had all the answers to the questions that a diagnosis sparks in parents. This includes where to find information about assessments, financial assistance, support groups, access to services and education about how to help their child and so on.

When your child receives a diagnosis of any illness or condition, it is a very distressing experience that can also feel very isolating, especially if you do not know any other parents in your position. It can also, at the same time, be a relief that you were not imagining these symptoms and that you now have a name for the problem. This is particularly true when the child has a hidden disability such as Asperger Syndrome or ADHD. For a while, parents need to take stock, maybe reassess their hopes and expectations for their child. Perhaps they also need to grieve.

But then comes the stark reality that they have to take action to help improve their child’s life chances – and that means finding accurate information and at a local level – who is a good paediatrician, which are the appropriate schools, does my child need an assessment for a statement and how do I go about that? How do I find out about occupational therapy or speech and language therapy?

There are lots of great volunteer organisations out there, but the problem is finding the ones that are right for you and your family. So, what is needed is someone who can be sympathetic and knowledgable and who can act as a support and a signposter, maybe even an introducer to that the family needs.

So, who can provide such a service? Who will fund it? These are two good questions – maybe someone reading this post has an answer. If you have any ideas how  this can be achieved or what else a newly diagnosed family might need, please leave a comment…

SEN stories that caught my attention this week.

Here are some stories I found interesting that touch on Special Educational Needs in the press this week. To get these and other posts delivered to your inbox, subscribe to this blog on the left.

GAPS – Early screening test for Specific Language Impairment & Dyslexia

Have you heard of GAPS? The chances are, the answer is no. And yet it’s billed as a highly accurate, easy to administer early assessment tool for detecting dyslexia and other language deficiencies in children.

It was developed by Professor Heather van der Lely, an eminent academic, using a friendly alien character called Bic, as a way of identifying children with language difficulty. It can be given by parents and professionals alike and uses repetition of sentences and non-words to identify children with a weakness in language, at risk of dyslexia or specific language impairment and those in need of further assessment and help.

It’s estimated that seven per cent of children have Specific Language Impairment (SLI) while ten per cent of children are estimated to have dyslexia. That’s a lot of people at risk of not reaching their full potential if they don’t get access to the help they need. The GAP test is designed for children between the ages of 3½ and 6½ and can be completed in as little as ten minutes to assess grammatical abilities and pre-reading skills (phonology) using standardised scores.

50% of children with Dyslexia have (undiagosed) Specific Languge Impairment; and 50% of children with SLI have Dyslexia too so these childre really need to be identified and helped so that their life chances are not limited by these problems.

Professor van der Lely’s aim is that all children in the UK will be tested prior to or when they enter school to try to ensure that any child with language weaknesses or impairment or at risk for dyslexia is identified.

However, since the test was launched in 2007, it has only been adopted by a minority of schools despite the test costing just £25 for professionals whoa re provided with 25 forms.

Obviously, once a test is carried out and a child has been identified, something then needs to be done about it. The problem here is that there is a lack of speech and language therapists in the public sector with more and more turning to private work. This is not, of course, a reason not to do the test in the first place so if schools are not taking it up, then perhaps parents who suspect that their child has an issue with language learning might want to order the test for themselves.

The Parental version (with 5 forms) costs £50 and Professional version (with 25 forms) costs £65. Thereafter forms only cost 80p each per child to test.

You can see a validation study of the system here. To find out more about GAPS, visit the GAPS website.

Special Educational Needs – Getting Started With Statements Unique new parent-to-parent ebook launched to help SEN children with ‘hidden disabilities’ get the help they need.

Today my book on is launched as an ebook. Here is the press release 

FARNHAM, 10th October 2011: A mother of two autistic boys from Farnham, Surrey has published a new book aimed at helping other parents navigate their way through the special educational needs jungle.

While there are other books about the SEN system available, this book, by the creator of the www.specialneedsjungle.co.uk website, Tania Tirraoro, takes a parent-to-parent approach, explaining in detail how to prepare an application for a statutory assessment of special educational needs.

Tania said, “Since I started my website in 2008, it’s become clear how daunting parents find the SEN process. Many parents of children with ASDs or dyslexia are affected by the conditions themselves and need help with organising and getting started on their applications. I’ve helped many parents with their applications and I realised that what they need is not an overview of the whole system that you find in other books, but a basic ‘how-to’, written in an accessible way. That is what I hope I’ve achieved.”

The book has a foreword by SEN campaigner and former parliamentary candidate Maria Hutchings, who famously hand-bagged Tony Blair during the 2005 election over the closure of special schools. It also contains a section on what to expect if you end up at an SEN Tribunal by experienced SEN Advocate, Julie Maynard.

Maria Hutchings said, “I only wish that I when I was going throug
h the statementing process striving to get John Paul the right education, speech therapy and respite for the family, that I had read this book. Being the mother of two children on the autistic spectrum, Tania has a deep sense of empathy for what it feels like when you have to fight for everything to ensure your child’s future. Tania captures that deep sense we all have as mothers and carers, to do the very best for our precious children.”

The book takes parents through the process from a very personal viewpoint with examples from successful applications and relevant quotes from the SEN Code of Practice and Education law.

Tania said, “I’ve been through the process twice and my boys, who both have Asperger Syndrome, now have access to the kind of education they need to help level the playing field in their future lives. ASD is a lifelong condition and they will always battle the difficulties of their Asperger’s, but because I had the ability to present their cases methodically, they got the help they need. Why should other children not have the same as my boys?”

The book is available now in all ebook formats from Amazon Kindle and Smashwords.com. If parents do not have a Kindle, then Kindle for PC, ipad or smartphone can be downloaded for free from Amazon.co.uk. It makes this book accessible to every parent, instantly.

It will be available in paperback in the next few weeks.

About the Author:

Tania Tirraoro is an author and journalist and has already published two women’s fiction novels, This Last Summer and Sweet Seduction, one as an ebook, the other available as ebook and in paperback. She is a former television and radio journalist, having worked as a reporter and news presenter for Meridian Television and NBC/CNBC, and BBC Radio Berkshire among others. She also works as a press consultant for three heart rhythm charities.You can find the SEN site at www.specialneedsjungle.co.uk.
Tania’s author site is at www.taniatirraoro.com

Twitter: @TaniaLT  @SpcialNdsJungle

E-Book Links:

Amazon.co.uk | Amazon.com | Smashwords

Tania Tirraoro can be contacted at info@specialneedsjungle.co.uk

My new book for parents looking for SEN help – launched Monday 10th October 2011

On Monday, I officially launch my new book aimed at helping parents of special needs children get the education they need. It’s first coming out in ebook format, followed by a paperback in a month.

The book’s called Special Educational Needs – Getting Started with Statements. It’s a parent-to-parent guide to starting to compile a statutory assessment application for you special needs child.
It’s tough enough having a child who has special educational needs – getting them the right help can seem like an impossible task. This book sets out in a simple, easy to follow way, a step-by-step guide to how to prepare the best application you can. While aimed at the UK Education system, parents everywhere will find it useful if they are trying to organise a case for their child.

I’ll write more about it on Monday, together with links to where you can buy it. In the meantime, it would be brilliant if you would pop over to the facebook launch page and say hello!

The event page is here: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=297761316917633

SEN Conference and launch coming up in Newbury in October

A two-day conference is being held for parents and professionals concerned with special educational needs is being held in Newbury, Berkshire on 14th and 15th October 2011. The conference, entitled “Towards a Positive Future”  is aimed at parents and professionals, to inspire, share experiences and discover how they can achieve more for children with special needs. The conference is being held on October 14-15 at Arlington Arts Centre, Newbury and has been organised by practitioners Wordswell and social entrepreneur Robert Ashton.

It will herald the launch of a new foundation that will enable practitioners to join together to provide multi-disciplinary specialist services for children with special educational needs. It’s hoped the Clarity Foundation could transform the present fragmented and bureaucratic system. The Foundation hopes to attract health and social care providers, as well as education specialists, to join as members who can be referred to families and local authorities as approved providers meeting statutory guidelines.

The foundation is the brainchild of speech and language therapist Janet O’Keefe and Robert Ashton, best selling business author, social entrepreneur and campaigner, who are passionate about providing a new joined-up efficient system which supports children and their families with educational support, while at the same time eliminating unnecessary duplication and bureaucracy.
There are currently 1.7 million children with special educational needs in England who require support for wide ranging conditions, from dyslexia, dyspraxia and Down’s syndrome, to autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Janet says: “We believe that having a one-stop shop is the best way to enable parents and local authorities find all the support services desperately needed by children with special needs, and that our foundation is the most practical and efficient way of ensuring that those services are integrated and coordinated. We need to bring practitioners from health, education and social care together and plan for the future while the present guidelines for new contract arrangements is under review. Our foundation will be a valuable database of all heath and social care providers, as well as education specialists.
“Additionally, we can streamline time consuming and expensive administrative processes. For example, we can help with criminal bureau checks and professional indemnity insurance. At the moment, if a practitioner is not directly employed by a school or local authority, every school they visit should conduct its own CRB check. Many practitioners regularly visit 20 schools a week sometimes in several different counties and are therefore checked 20 times.”
Robert says it makes good sense to become more efficient during the present shake up of these services:
He says: “However you feel about the Government’s “Big Society” agenda, the fact is that the worlds of education, health and social care are undergoing massive change. The Clarity Foundation is being formed to help parents make sense of those changes, and in parallel to help practitioners create their own enterprises. That way both groups can connect, create opportunities and meet the needs of young people striving to overcome disadvantage.”
Specialist speakers include educational psychologist and former head teacher Charlie Mead, who has worked with children with severe emotional and behavioural problems and special needs for 20 years and Kevin Geeson, CEO of Dyslexia Action, who will highlight the impact of the SEN Green Paper.
Janet is also launching a book she has edited at the conference also called Towards a Positive Future which includes stories, ideas and inspiration from children with special educational needs, their families and professionals.
Full details about the conference can be found at their website, Towards a Positive Future: http://towardsapositivefuture.wordpress.com/

The Right Support Gets Results

Clare’s son was written off as lazy by teachers as a child. Severely Dyslexic and Dyspraxic, he faced an uphill battle in learning to read and write, let alone trying to succeed at French lessons alongside his peers in mainstream state school.

At school he was bullied by other pupils, segregated in food technology lessons because of allergies and given detentions because working memory problems meant he could not remember to bring everything he needed to class.

Clare said: “I was told by a Teacher at my Son’s School when he was six years old and she didn’t believe he was dyslexic , she said, he will never be an Einstein” I looked at her straight in the eyes and said “Do you realise Einstein was Dyslexic?” the look on her face was a picture, as though she wanted the floor to swallow her up”

Clare was determined that her son should get the support he needed that was not available at his school near Camberley. She fought Hampshire County Council for more than two years until they were forced by a Special Needs Tribunal to fund Michael at a specialist school that could help him achieve his potential.

This month, after much hard work, Clare’s son was ecstatic to learn he had scored an A in GCSE English that he sat before Christmas. Clare believes it’s a direct result of him getting the support he needed to overcome his problems:

“How amazing! It  just shows if a Dyslexic person is taught properly they can be amazing at English. I’m so proud of him.”

Even though the process of getting the support in place made Clare ill, she now helps other parents who are struggling with the Special Educational Needs System to get their children the help they need so they have the opportunity to do as well as her own son.

More House – A School To Be Proud Of

Saturday was the last official day of term – Founder’s Day. This is something we all look forward to and I don’t mean for the strawberries, cream and sparking wine you get at the end either.

It is the day we get to celebrate our boys’ achievements throughout the year, hear the Headmaster’s end of year review speech and listen to a visiting VIP make the keynote address. This year it was David Moran, the new  Ambassador to the Republic of Kazakhstan and Non-Resident Ambassador to the Kyrgyz Republic, whose talk included the notion that these years the boys spend at More House School will help them forge their characters that they will take with them through their lives.

There is a prize giving, where the boys are awarded certificates for particular areas of excellence and this is all the more touching because many are given in subjects where the boys have faced real challenges. Each boy returning to his seat with his certificates was beaming with pride; a feeling that we parents marvel at, knowing only too well how difficult their journeys have been so far. For our own two boys, we laminate their certificates and put them on the wall of their rooms so they can be reminded every day that hard work gets results.

But the highlights of the day were the speeches given by the outgoing School Captains. The two sixth-formers, smartly dressed in suits, came to the podium to give accounts of their time at More House. The first opened by saying that when he arrived at the school he was a dyslexic. Now, upon leaving, he is a dyslexic with attitude and confidence. He has a place at university and thanks to the education he has received has a great chance at a successful life.

The second young man opened his remarks by noting his diagnosis of Dyslexia and ADHD. When he arrived at the school he said, he was unable to sit still long enough to learn anything, but at MHS he was never excluded from any event or activity (as I presume had been the case at a previous school). He had received a good education both academically and socially and he stood before us a fine young man and School Captain, a son to be proud of as I am sure his parents are.

Both young men took the time to thank the school’s Headmaster, Barry Huggett, who is held in the highest esteem by all the boys and their parents. Mr Huggett is an inspirational figure and he leads the school with dedication, dignity and passion. He announced that the latest GCSE results showed an 83% A-C pass rate, which considering the number and range of difficulties experienced by the boys when they arrived, is outstanding.

Several things became crystal clear for me yesterday. The first is that the dedicated sixth-former I have seen at many events is, in fact, the Music teacher, Mr Place, which just shows me how old I’m getting. The second is that, contrary to government inclusion doctrine, the kind of school you go to is absolutely key to your future life. Had the School Captain gone to a normal mainstream secondary, he may well have left at sixteen with no qualifications and little chance of a bright future. Now he has university to look forward to and a real shot at success.

Some of the boys get support in exams such as extra time or scribes to help them show their true potential. Mr Huggett aims to cut the number by half, and then within a few years, to eliminate the need for special help in exams altogether. This is a lofty goal but one that, knowing Mr Huggett and his staff, I can see being achieved.

To all the staff at More House School, have a wonderful summer – you’ve earned it.

Journey’s End for our Statement – And a Brighter Future.

Just to update the post about my son getting the statement of Special Needs, we’ve just heard that the LEA has agreed to fund him at his independent special school. Great news and what a relief!

When they issued the draft statement they said they were concerned how he would manage in mainstream secondary.. so they were going to recommend mainstream secondary with support. Now we know, don’t we, that for many children with Asperger’s, it’s not a question of someone sitting with them or being withdrawn into social skills groups for so many hours a week. It is more a constant nudging that they need and a vigilant eye for when things are starting to go wrong.

During my research, I spoke to several mainstream SENCOs (Special Needs Coordinators). They are all dedicated to their pupils and do a good job in difficult circumstances, but one said to me that they sometimes “don’t hear from their ASD students for months until something goes wrong”. She was saying this to illustrate how these students ‘coped’ adequately with day to day school life. All I could think was that at my boys’ school the teachers are in constant contact with the boys and things are never left for months until something goes wrong. Although this teacher was trying to be positive and reassuring, I knew then that my son would end up depressed and unhappy in an environment where he could go unnoticed for months at a time.

Why should he simply ‘cope’ when other children thrive? This is not what I wanted for a boy who is incredibly bright with enormous potential but who is also extremely sensitive with sensory issues and problems with social integration. On the face of it, you wouldn’t think there was anything different about him. But it is precisely when ‘things go wrong’ that you see that he is not the same as everyone else and does not have the coping skills that most children his age have.

This is what More House School teaches him. As well as supporting him academically, it supports his social needs on a daily basis and when they see that he is heading for trouble or he becomes upset, they can help him develop the skills he needs so that when he is an adult, difficult situations don’t throw him off-course. This means that when he leaves school to go out into the outside world, he will be as well-equipped as anyone else to deal with all kinds of situations and different types of people.

If we hadn’t managed to get the LEA to agree to fund him, we would have had to pay £13,000 a year for our son to receive the right kind of education to give him the best chance of a successful life. We had tried mainstream and had found that, with the best will in the world, the kind of support he needed wasn’t available. So why should we have to pay for him to get what every other child in mainstream gets without any bother? We didn’t opt out of the state system out of snobbery. We were, in effect, forced out, because our sons were not mainstream children.

Our LEA seems to have woken up to the fact that it is cheaper and easier to pay for children to go to this particular school than it is to find all the support they need within the state system. If they had to make their own school for high-functioning ASD boys, complex dyslexics (who often have co-morbidities), and children with great Occupational Therapy and Speech and Language needs, they would have all the capital costs to pay on top of  the per-pupil cost. These would include buildings and maintenance, electricity and all those other costs that don’t include teachers and support staff salaries and benefits.

Just paying £13,000, and leaving it up to someone else probably seems like a great deal. We haven’t asked them to pay transport – we moved to be closer so I can easily take them myself every day as I would if they were at any school. This is my part of the deal as transport costs are a never-ending headache for LEAs and I see no reason to add to the burden when I am in a position, and more than happy, to take them myself.

However, although Surrey, our LEA, have done the right thing for both my sons, (and three cheers for them), I know of other families who are having to fight tooth and nail and at great expense to get their local authority to do the same. I know of one child in Hampshire, who got a statement with no argument but despite his severe social as well as physical needs, the LEA thinks he will be able to cope with a mainstream placement against ALL the advice they have received. This is pig-headed stupidity and a game of brinkmanship with parents to see who will blink first. There is no logic to it and when the case gets to Tribunal, Hampshire will lose and will have wasted taxpayers money fighting a case that didn’t need to be fought. The family will have suffered emotionally, financially and completely avoidably.

Hampshire have recognised this child’s needs for OT and SLT in part two of his statement and yet have made no provision in part three of the same document and they think this is acceptable. They think it is okay just to dump him in the local secondary where his needs cannot be met (and the family has the documentation to prove it). Hampshire should know that it won’t intimidate this boy’s mum. She is every bit as determined as I was to make sure her son gets the placement he needs. It is appalling that she should have to put herself under considerable strain to do so. I will keep you posted as to what happens.

Rose Dyslexia report – will it be enough?

Government adviser Sir Jim Rose’s report on dyslexia has been widely reported today. BBC News said, “More teachers will be trained to identify and support children in England with dyslexia, as a report says greater expertise is needed in schools. Sir Jim Rose, who recently reviewed the English primary school curriculum, said parents needed guidance on the help available.  The government says 4,000 teachers will be trained, and online courses provided to help them support dyslexic pupils.Charity Dyslexia Action called it a “landmark report” and a “great step forward” to have a definition of dyslexia which those affected could recognise and accept.

boyworkingIn his report, Sir Jim defines dyslexia as a “learning difficulty which primarily affects skills involved in accurate and fluent word-reading and spelling”.  The report will say dyslexia should not be treated as a distinct category of people, but as a continuum, like other disorders. He is also expected to reiterate that good quality teaching in children’s early years is vital.”

The link to the full BBC report is at the bottom of this post but what strikes me is that it has taken this long for a report to be done. Dyslexia is not new and the fact that it is only now being ‘officially’ recognised is a scandal. Whole generations of people have had their lives blighted because they have had unrecognised and untreated dyslexia. Instead, they have been branded ‘thick’ and have not been able to develop the life chances they should have.

I sincerely hope that this report’s recommendations will be acted upon so that teachers can learn not only how to identify children with forms of dyslexia but know how to do something about it. As I have said before, if the government wants ‘inclusion’ then mainstream teachers cannot just teach the mainstream. If teachers don’t have the access to the funding or training to make their teaching truly inclusive, then once a child is recognised as having a problem, they should be given access to teachers that can help them.

Ten million pounds doesn’t actually seem that much to provide all the help that is required, but it is a start and should be recognised as such.

I am no expert, however, I am of the opinion that some children with ‘continuum’ difficulties such as dyslexia and ASD need a different teaching style altogether that can only be delivered in a specialist environment. I have helped various parents with their statementing battles and have seen quite a few Educational Psychology reports. What seems to be a theme is that the working memory and non-verbal skills of these children is almost always poor, sometimes dramatically so, compared to their basic level of intelligence. This means they have difficulty remembering instructions and sequences, problems with attention and with organisation. These are in addition (though connected)  to the problems they have with making sense of reading or writing or both.

This group of issues will be difficult for a teacher with thirty other pupils adequately to address, however much training they have. They are, after all, only one person and are not superhuman, unless there are government plans to provide funding for that too. Isn’t it better that these children learn together and are taught in the way they learn best? It is great that teachers will be trained to spot Dyslexia – they should also be trained to spot and act when they believe a child is on the autistic spectrum as well. But my concerns are that we are simply asking too much of teachers when they have so many children of all varieties to deal with.

The answer could be in smaller class sizes so each child can get individualised learning, or grouping children according to learning styles. In our school, dyslexic, dyspraxic, dyscalculic and Aspergic children learn alongside each other in small groups because their learning styles are more similar and the class sizes are small enough that where differences exist, they can be catered for. Eight children may need things explained eight different ways, but that’s feasible in such a small class. I question whether that’s possible in a class of thirty.

It should be possible in a junior school of children with three-class intake per year to be sensitively placed so that the teacher has a fighting chance of helping everyone. When my younger son was in mainstream, he was made to go into the remedial English group because he had problems writing, even though his reading was top of the whole year. He was angry, frustrated and sometimes had to be dragged to the lesson because he knew he was in the wrong group. Now in his specialist school, he is supported in his areas of difficulties while still doing work that is at the correct level for his intelligence. We had to move him into the independent sector to get this but this kind of teaching should be available to every child whether or not they have the parents who are willing and able to fight battles to get them what they need.

This report looks like a good marker for future practice if the recommendations are acted upon. We await other reports that are ongoing such as the Lamb Inquiry and the other autism bills that are going through parliament to see whether a real difference can be made and the future of another generation of children is not lost to the vagaries of government policy.

BBC report here: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8109554.stm

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Child-Free.. as free as the wind blows..

This morning, without so much as a backwards glance, both our boys climbed on board a coach with their classmates and set off for their annual trip to PGL. For us, this means no children in the house for the next four days. We still have the dog of course, but he doesn’t put up a fight at bedtime or complain that dinner is ‘disgusting’.

At the same time as feeling ever-so-slighly elated, our hearts do go out to those brave teachers venturing forth with fifty boys aged between 7 and 11, all with some type of special need. These range from dyslexia, to speech difficulties to Asperger’s Syndrome. The teachers know only too well what puzzled faces could ensue with the saying, ‘It’s raining cats and dogs’.

Far from being tough little tykes, practically all these boys have in their backpacks their cuddly toys, blankets or other comforter, even the big strapping ones like my 11 year old. He has his old cotton cellular cot blanket, a stuffed reindeer and two stuffed Club Penguin plushies, all shoved down into his rucksack along with his tuck for the trip.

Our boys went on the trip last year and then, there were  a few tears from my youngest before he set off, but as soon as he was on the coach, he was smiling again. I shed more tears on the way home at the thought of them being away from me on a school holiday for the first time. When they returned, I was going through Son1’s bag and there was a suspicious amount of clean underwear, an untouched toothbrush and a still-neatly folded flannel. It turned out that he hadn’t washed, cleaned his teeth or changed his pants for the whole four days.

Despite this squalour, he still managed to bag himself a posh girlfriend at the end of trip disco. She rang him so often afterwards that I heard him say to her, “Can you not ring me so often, it’s getting a bit annoying.” Oh dearie me, he has a lot to learn.. but then he was only 10 at the time.

This year Son2 is determined to grab himself a girl as well. He has carefully chosen himself a pink linen shirt from Zara and refused to get his hair cut so it’s nice and long and trendy. However, after his success last year, Son1 is uber-confident that the prep school fillies will be throwing themselves at his feet again. He’s offered his brother a few pointers, but let’s hope his tips on personal hygiene aren’t among them..

Mother Needs Help For Self-Harming Son

I have just been contacted through this site by Sharon, a mother from Kent, whose son has been excluded from school following incidents of self-harming.

She writes, “My ADHD, ASD, Dyslexic, self-harming son, has just been excluded from school, because they don’t think Luke trying to strangle himself in class or him regularly saying he wants to kill himself, is a good role model for the other pupils. Their answer, discriminate (against) Luke for his disability. He needs support, not rejection and that’s all this exclusion is to him, rejection!”

This is apparently the second time Luke’s school has excluded him. His mother, Sharon, believes it is not Luke’s fault but it is because the staff in his mainstream school are not trained to deal with ADHD or Autistic Spectrum children.

Sharon is at her wits end. She says, among other self-harming incidents, her son has also tried to hang himself in the school’s P.E. cupboard. I have recommended that she contact SOS!SEN. Luke has been refused a Statutory Assessment Kent LEA and his parents have appealed to the SENDIST tribunal, which will be heard later this year.

Sharon says, “It looks like Luke will not have a secondary school to go to this year. The tribunal is only for a Statutory Assessment, then we need to go through the whole process yet again for a statement! We have already been to CAMHS for over a year now. No counselling, he was put on a waiting list for a ASD assessment, but there was a 13 month waiting list for that. The last time we went to CAMHS a new Dr. saw Luke and we now have a diagnosis of ADHD & ASD tendencies. Were awaiting a dyslexia test, and counselling for the self harming, which is quite evident to everyone, but they chose to ignore it, or put it down to bad parenting!”

Sharon says that Luke’s primary school failed to get him the help he needed and his problems are now worse as a result. I don’t know all the details of Luke’s case but it certainly seems to be an impossible situation to be in. However, it isn’t sadly, unique. Why is it that children in severe need of help with psychological problems are so often failed by those professionals around them?

I send my best wishes to Sharon and hope she manages to get the education and counselling for Luke that he deserves. If anyone reading this can offer free legal or medical advice to sharon, please contact me at info@specialneedsjungle.co.uk or make a comment below. Thank you.

Parents rate local authority Disabilities service at 59%

When I was at school, a score of 59% definitely meant ‘could do better’, if not ‘should do better’. But that’s the score received by 10 local authorities in England for their disability services.

The survey, completed by the British Market Research Bureau on behalf of the government was intended to measure parental experience of services for disabled children. The survey and indicator have been developed as part of the Aiming High for Disabled Children programme.

It is the first ever national survey of parents’ views of services for disabled children. Parents completed a questionnaire asking for their views of health, social care and education services for their disabled child as experienced in the past year.

Srabani Sen, Chief Executive of Contact a Family said, “The views of parents should drive local authorities and primary care trusts to ensure that the right services are available to meet the needs of disabled children and their families. This new data is vital in emphasising the key part that parents and families have to play in improving services for disabled children. We know that these services work best when parents are involved in their design and delivery, and I hope that local areas will be able to use the results to continue the good work that many of them are already doing to engage with parents and develop services together.”

The fact that they are measuring this to determine a baseline for future improvements is great, but 59%? Just over half? That’s a lot of people who are dissatisfied with the care and education their disabled children are receiving.  It is clear that this kind of rating of services is long overdue and that many local authorities need to try harder to provide a satisfactory service to vulnerable children who need the greatest help.

Great News – A Statement!

Got the news we had been waiting for today – Son1 has got the Statement of Special Educational Needs we had applied for. Don’t have all the details yet and we still have to sort out placement (which if I have anything to do with it will be his current school).

This time last year the head of our school’s Learning Support department told me I should apply for a statement for Son1. I thought she was mad, because he is achieving well although his educational profile is uneven and his progress is affected by his social and communication difficulties caused by his Asperger Syndrome. Still, I thought, she wouldn’t say it if she didn’t mean it. We had been through the process before withour younger son and he is now funded at their independent special school by the Local Education Authority and I didn’t relish another trip down the same road. Still, I reminded myself, it’s not for you, it’s for my boy, took a deep breath and plunged in.

I started out by applying for an assessment, which was initially turned down (see earlier post). After they reversed the decision and carried out an assessment, it went to the area special needs panel yesterday and the news came through that he had been given a statement.

It does beg the question, why was he refused an assessment and then is given a statement and I think this is largely down to the ‘new broom’ approach at the local LEA.

I now have to convince them that paying for him to attend his current independent specialist school is the right thing to do, so no time to waste! It does show however, that if you do your research, persevere (like I said, I started this path a year ago) and you are sure of your case, then you can come out with the result you believe your child should have.

It may take longer than a year for some, depending on whether you need to appeal, but I was originally told neither of my sons would get a statement and now they have one each. I used the methods I have described on this website (see links at the top of the page) both times. So, anyone reading this who is onthe same road, take heart and don’t give up!

See the outcome here

Celebrate Calm – well worth signing up for.

I am taking the liberty of quoting from an email newsletter I subscribe to ‘Celebrate Calm, written by Kirk Martin. It is about his son who, like many of our children, marches to the beat of his own drum:

“The following message is very personal and my wife never likes me sharing it, but it seems to strike a chord with people and provide helpful perspective. I wrote this about Casey several years ago–for those who have met him at the workshops, you know that Casey is no longer a little boy (except at heart)!

I look at other people’s kids who are compliant, excel in school and are sailing through childhood. And I really like those kids, I do. At one point, I wanted a child like that and wished I had an easy kid at home. But now? I wrote the following one night after peeking in at my son sleeping. I encourage you to do the same. I hope you will discover some common feelings toward your child.

The Beat of a Different Drummer
I peek in at him late at night lying in bed, fast asleep, my no-longer-little guy sprawled out across his bed, long unruly mess of hair covering his face. . .and I smile. I smile because he is full of personality. He is so different than me in many ways, different than my expectations, different than the little boy I had always imagined. And for that I am grateful. He’s his own person, knows what he likes and doesn’t like. I look in at him, peaceful and innocent while he sleeps. The fight is gone and his little mind is resting. He’s gone full force for the last sixteen hours, he needs a break.

I like it that he pushes the limits, like it that he questions everything, because one day he’s going to do something spectacular. Along the way, he’s going to make some big mistakes, but he’s going to live large and dream large. Underneath the spunk and mouth is a heart not only lined with gold, but filled with it. It is large and feeling, and it wants to do good even when his impulses lead him astray at times.

I think God must look down and confuse him with a little tornado. But I also think God looks down and likes what He has created, likes the little tornado who is growing into a man.

I think He sees Himself in my little boy, funny as that sounds. The part of God who is the Creator, who by the sheer force of His energy and being created life and all that is in the world. The part of God who was willing to step into humanity and persevere on a rugged cross because it would help people. The part of God who walked among men, largely misunderstood, often reviled because He was different and didn’t do things the way the rulers of His era thought they should be done.

But He kept going. Because He, too, had a mission. He didn’t care what others thought. His vision was larger than a mere thirty-three years on earth.

I think God must see Himself in the part that sometimes misses out on earthly things because he’s in tune with something deep inside another person. The part who remains an idealist even when the world around him is less than ideal. The part that isn’t afraid to look into eternity and see better things in all of us.

That is my son sleeping there. We fought each other until we couldn’t fight anymore. Until I realized that I was the one who needed to change, because I wasn’t going to change his nature. Perhaps he has been given to me so that I would change.

That is my son. Sometimes he inspires anger, sometimes frustration. Then he makes me laugh, even smile in resignation. And as I look at him, he makes me cry. He is a wonderful creation. Through all the struggles, I can see the imprints of the Creator.

He is my son. He marches to the beat of a different drummer. Thank God.”

I hope he won’t mind me republishing this but these emails have always been very helpful to me and are well worth signing up for. He also has a range of self-help CDs, and is US based. Find him here: http://www.celebratecalm.com/

Surrey to review SEN Assessments

I recently attended a Partnership with Parents workshop in Surrey. The subject matters were an explanation of the new SEND rules given by one of the co-chairmen,an update on the Lamb inquiry and a presentation from the new Head of Surrey SEN, Debbie Johnson, asking ‘Why do so many parents appeal against Surrey’s ‘Refusal to Assess’ decisions’.

I was particularly looking forward to the latter, as although my younger son is statemented, my eldest son had recently been refused an assessment by Surrey. Ms Johnson was a very impressive speaker and was concerned about Surrey’s position at the top of the charts for councils that have appeals registered against it. Much to the surprise of many in the room, she said that what should be happening is that if Surrey LEA was not going to defend its decision at the SEND Tribunal or thought it might give way if an appeal was launched, then it should actually not be refusing to assess in the first place. This was new! Someone with common sense! We all sat up a little straighter.

Ms Johnson said there was a lot to be done in Surrey and the feedback she was getting was that parents weren’t being listened to, the process wasn’t helpful and she was going to change that. She said the changes had to ‘unbend the system’ and make statements ‘fit for purpose’. She would be disbanding panels that took parents around in circles and stop decisions being made that were not clear for either the parents not the authority.

It also appeared from figures she presented that, that in line with the large number of refusals to assess was an equally large number of pupils in Surrey diagnosed with ASD. Could these stats be related? Could it be that a lack of expertise within county provision in the field of high-functioning Autism and Asperger’s, coupled with an increasing number of parents unwilling to go down without a fight is at the root of Surrey’s large number of appeals? As Hong Kong Phooey would say .. ‘Could be!’

Ms Johnson then described the difficulties faced by a highly intelligent child with Asperger’s in a mainstream setting. She described my son to a tee. Afterwards, I spoke individually to her and she agreed to visit my son’s case again.

And guess what? True to her word, this week I heard that the decision has been reversed, my son is now going to be assessed and I am so relieved that this part of the application is now resolved. There was also additional evidence I presented to them as part of the reconsideration and I am sure this made some difference; having been turned down I had sprung into action and prepared an fulsome appeal so I was able to send it to them to see if we could avoid the necessity of going to Tribunal and it seems this has had an effect. The lesson is, if you believe strongly in your case, DO NOT give up! Those who make the decisions are only human, just like you, errors can be made or minds can be changed if you provide a convincing enough case. But you have to put the effort in – don’t ask and you don’t get.

Back at the workshop, in spite of her ‘new broom’ presentation, Ms Johnson wasn’t let entirely off the hook – many parents had serious grievances about the LEA’s past practices, including one family who had been threatened with costs (illegally) if they went ahead with a Tribunal hearing the next day. To her credit, Ms Johnson tackled the issues head on and took the particular case mentioned extremely seriously. I might pity the hapless LEA employee who made the threat if it hadn’t been such an unethical thing to do in the first place.

I left feeling vaguely cheered, though it remains to be seen how much difference Ms Johnson’s new broom makes to the way Surrey carries out its practices. I, and parents like me, will be watching closely.

See the next post ‘The SENDIST Tribunal’ for information on that part of the workshop.

The SEN Assessment Form – Yipes!

A few people have mentioned to me how daunting they find the form that comes for you to fill in to apply for a Statutory Assessment for your child. They’re worried they’ll forget something, they won’t phrase what they want to say in the right way, or that they’ll just do it all wrong and blow their chance.

I don’t know how every LEA approaches the application; whether they all send out a form or whether some do it another way. Ours send a form with questions and boxes to write in your answers as a guideline to help parents know what to include. The LEA has made the form in the first place because they do actually want to help find out what a child’s issues are. The problem is, it often makes the task more difficult because some people may think that’s all they can put in, or leave stuff out that needs to be in because there was no obvious place to put it or stop at the end of the box because they think that’s all they’re allowed to write.

I would suggest putting the form to one side, sitting down at your computer or with pen and paper and just writing your child’s story. You, bar no-one, know them the best. You are the one who has agonised over your child’s progress, or lack thereof, you are the one who has more than likely wept over the fact that they don’t fit in or just can’t get to grips with things that other children have no trouble with at all.

Start at the beginning, from the day they were born. Note down any problems with the birth, unusual development, recurrent medical or social problems, how they get on with others and with school work. You will be amazed how much you can write and you’ll probably shed a few more tears as you do it as well.

If you then want to fill in the form, you’ll be able then to pull things out of your narrative to put in the spaces. Or just leave the form out altogether and redraft your narrative making sure you’ve covered all the questions on the form as well as everything else you want to say. This is your chance to put your child’s case. If you’re turned down for assessment you will be able to appeal, but the more relevant information you put in now, the less likely it is that you’ll have to.

Refer to reports your child has had done and send copies of them along as well with your application. Go through the reports you have and pull out the parts that strengthen your case.

For example. “In his assessment on 21/4/06, Dr X remarked that Johnny has great potential but his lack of social skills was likely to adversely affect his learning. Please see report (numbered 7) enclosed with application.”

Then number that report number 7 or whatever number you’ve given it, and enclose it with your application. You could then back this up with remarks teachers have made to you or with comments from Johnny’s year end report, which you will also number and enclose.

If their writing is a problem, send in samples of it. If reading is a problem, write down the level they’re reading at or perhaps that they avoid reading because they find it frustrating. If they are desperately unhappy because they are bullied because of their differences, mention this as well. If their frustration makes them angry and violent or unpredictable or friendless, write this down too.

But my best advice when approaching your application is to tell your child’s story first and foremost. You don’t need to be a world class writer, but do use the spell checker on your computer or get someone else to read it over for you if you’re unsure. Enlist the help of a group such as Parent Partnership if you’re lacking support.

No one knows your child like you do. Others, such as teachers, will have a different and valuable perspective, so speak to them and include what they say in your application. The SENCo will be asked in any event by the LEA to fill in their side of things but speaking to them yourself will inform you of things you may not have known.

Update: I’ve just added a help template under “SEN Assessment Form Part 2

It’s all about the school.

Yesterday, my son was discharged from regular check ups with his nurse practitioner at his specialist clinic, a cause for celebration. She has been a wonderful support to us along the way to getting the best we can for him but now he has started at an appropriate school for his needs, he no longer needs medication to help him focus because there are only nine boys in a class and he is taught in the way he learns best (imagine!).

His nurse said there’s nothing she can now offer that he isn’t getting at school and she’s right; it’s all about the school. A paediatrician at the centre said the same thing: one size doesn’t fit all and the right school can make the difference between a life of underachievement and a fighting chance of success.

What chance does an ASD child, even with TA support, have in a class of thirty (several of whom probably have behavioural difficulties or other issues) when that child has sensory integration problems and needs a quiet environment to be able to put pen to paper at all? What chance for success does a bright child have who reads several years ahead of his age but can barely write, when he’s left to fester in a remedial English group where he refuses to work because he feels his intelligence is being insulted?

This is the conundrum faced by mainstream schools when trying to educate children with complex needs. It’s just not possible to put him in a group with his intellectual peers because he thinks so differently and can’t keep up with writing speed. But putting him in a group with children who write as slowly as he does means he’s frustrated and not challenged. The same is true for many bright dyslexic children; where do you put them if they’re clever enough to be in the ‘top’ stream, but whose reading or writing difficulties mean they can’t present their work as well or whose thought processes don’t follow ‘the norm’?

Can mainstream provide sufficient expertise and support for these children? Politicians pushing the ‘inclusive’ agenda say it is perfectly possible and perhaps in a very few schools that have sufficient specialist staff and resources, this may be the case but for the majority, it just isn’t.

I was told when my son was in mainstream that there were five accepted methods for doing maths at his level. My son had his own, sixth, very complicated method and even though he would get the right answer, I was told he had to conform to one of the methods laid out in the national curriculum. Good luck with that, I thought, because you’ll have a job on your hands.

I have spoken to many highly experienced teachers, special needs Teaching Assistants, Outreach staff and Clinicians in the past few years. NOT A SINGLE ONE believes inclusion for children with complex learning styles or difficulties in the answer. Not one. Why are their views being ignored in the relentless push for everyone to be taught in one setting? Please, if you know, make a comment and enlighten me. It’s possible that I and they are all misguided souls. But somehow, I don’t think so.