A spin around The Autism Show

Last Saturday, Debs and I visited The Autism Show at London’s Excel. Poor Debs fell over the dog a couple of days earlier and has her wrist in a splint so my long-suffering husband, Marco, came along as chief wheelchair-pusher and photographer, so thank you to him for putting up with my constant requests to go, stop, get closer, further away and turn left and left (I can’t remember right).

It was great to put faces to names and we excitedly foisted lots of our brand new SNJ pens onto people whether they wanted one or not.

We had an interesting chat with Mark Hayes from Autism Eye which is a great publication – free copies were available at the show. The magazine is also available as a digital download as well.

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Tania, Anna Kennedy, Debs

It was a whistlestop tour as I had to dash back to watch Son1 play bass in the school Jazz Band at a local Fayre  (they were splendiferous, if you like jazz take a peek at this. You can’t really see Son1, he’s the blond kid right at the back). Because of this we didn’t get time to see the Autism’s Got Talent show, but we did meet and have a chat with its founder, the tireless Anna Kennedy. Among her many achievements, Anna has started her own autism school, published a dance DVD for people with autism and hosted many, many events to improve the lives of young people with ASD, as well as having her own special needs children.

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Peter from SEN Mag, Tania & Debs

I was also delighted to meet in person, Peter Sutcliffe, the Editor of SEN Magazine. I have written for SEN Magazine in the past and subscribe myself – it’s a great source of information and ideas!

The award winning team from SEN Assist were also there. They make educational software for children with SEN and Adele, the company’s founder also works at Freemantles Special School, so she has plenty of young people to test her products on!

There were lots of stands with interesting resources, specialist schools, sensory equipment, legal services, and even products made by young people with autism from LVS Oxford. They teach their students real skills they can use in adult life, which of course, brings with it increased confidence and self-esteem. I bought some of their lavender sachets, my favourite scent (very old fashioned, I know!) Son2 decided when we got home that as he is a fan of lavender as well, I must have bought them for him. I have not seen them since but his room is smelling suspiciously fragrant.

IPSEA were on hand to give free advice in private cubicles and there was a big presence of course from the NAS and Ambitious About Autism

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Evelyn Hope Ashford & Debs

One great resource we will be featuring in more depth soon is Advocacy Service, Education Equality founded by Evelyn Hope Ashford. It is a low-cost advocacy SEN service and their advocates can also accompany you to meetings, tribunals and so on. Check out their website for more information.

We met so many amazing people in such a short amount of time! I really think the world of special needs is blessed to have so many energetic, dedicated and just bloody amazing people working to help children with SEN/D. Many, if not most of them are in the sector because of their own direct experience as parents of children with disabilities.

Finally, I end the post with an apology. I was due to co-present with Debs at the Wordswell Towards a Positive Future conference this Thursday. Unfortunately, I have realised after the weekend’s activities of Autism Show, Fayre and supermarket (how very dare I!) left me too exhausted to move on Monday, that it’s just not possible for me to manage the demands of travel and a day long conference. EDS and PoTS strike again!

However, Debs will be holding the SNJ fort and she has a brilliant presentation about parental co-production. I understand there are just a few places left, so if you are near London or can travel, tickets are just £30 for parents including lunch – and the chance to meet Debs of course and grab an SNJ pen – who could resist?

Other presentations will be from IPSEA’s Jane McConnell and Child Psychologist Charlie Mead, both of whom I am very sad to be missing. I am a great admirer of Jane and Charlie is one of my heroes for his brilliant work with vulnerable children.

If you do go, let me know your feedback – it’s a great line-up and our Debs is a complete star; I’m so proud to have her with me on Special Needs Jungle. We have lots of exciting things lined up in the next few months. The TES logo top left is a clue!

Did you go to The Autism Show? What did you think?

Rough Draft SEN Code of Practice published

SEN Reform imageLate yesterday, the DfE published the “Indicative draft Code of Practice” as a “work in progress” to go with the SEN/D provisions in the Children & families bill, now going through parliament.

The DfE describe the Code of Practice thus:

The SEN Code of Practice is statutory guidance that provides practical advice on how to carry out statutory duties to identify, assess and make provision for children and young people’s SEN as set out in the Children and Families Bill (currently before Parliament).

The Code also sets out how legislation and regulations concerning children and young people with disabilities works alongside this.

The DfE says a subsequent draft for formal consultation will be produced later in 2013. After this, a final draft will undergo Parliamentary scrutiny in time for it to come into force alongside the Children and Families legislation.

This Indicative CoP is a sort of rough draft devised from early pathfinder learning and from the consultation that took place when the earlier versions of the C&F bill were published.

Additionally it published ‘Illustrative Regulations” and an “SEN Evidence Pack” pulling together the information that has informed the Bill.

It just isn’t possible to write an in-depth analysis of an 86 page document and two additional publications here in less than 24 hours. We’ll be bringing you that in the course of the next few weeks.

Debs and I will be busy reading over the weekend, as on Monday, we’ve been invited to meet the Minister, Ed Timpson. I also have a few other great ideas to mention then as well. (I bet he can hardly wait)

So far, I’ve got through more than half the Indicative CoP and so here are some initial points:

References to statutory duties 

The text uses the word MUST to refer to a statutory requirement and SHOULD to refer to guidance which is a non-statutory requirement.

It emphasises the need for a fully engaged Health system through Clinical Commissioning Groups and other health bodies.

Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) and, where responsible for children and young people with SEN, the NHS Commissioning Board, will be full partners in the new arrangements for securing the provision to meet these needs.

This is obviously a great idea, but, judging from what I’m reading in the press about the difficulties CCGs are facing before they’ve even fully launched, one can’t help but feel…uneasy at best.

Parental Involvement

Parents/carers figure heavily in the document, particularly in relation to helping for develop services at a strategic level and on a family level about schools fully involving parents when it comes to how their child will be helped.

Some teachers and indeed, many parents, will find this quite difficult for many reasons and this is why culture change on both sides is vital.

The CoP document talks about Parent-Carer forums and the support and remuneration they need to be fully engaged, although it does not detail what this should be.

Schools and colleges need to ensure that they fully engage parents and young people with SEN when drawing up policies that affect them. Pupil forums should always ensure that there is representation from pupils with SEN. Schools and colleges should also take steps to ensure that parents and young people are actively supported in contributing to assessment, planning and review processes.

The knowledge and understanding that parents have about their child is key information that can help teachers and others to meet their child’s needs. Enabling parents to share their knowledge and engage in positive discussion instils confidence that their contribution is valued and acknowledged.

2.2: Person-centred planning 

A key approach that ensures that parents and carers, children and young people are actively placed at the heart of the system is person centred planning. A person centred approach to planning means that planning should start with the individual (not with services), and take account of their wishes and aspirations, and the support they need to be included and involved in their community. It aims to empower parents, children and young people so that they have more control over assessment and decision-making processes. It enables continual listening and learning, focusing on what is important to someone now and in the future, and acting on this in partnership with their family and their friends.

The integrated arrangements for commissioning services for children and young people with SEN must promote the involvement of children and young people, and their parents, carers and representatives in decisions which relate to their care, and in the development and review of a local offer of services, derived from commissioning plans which reflect the strategic participation of local young people and their families. CCGs will want to engage with Healthwatch organisations, patient representative groups, Parent-Carer forums and other local voluntary organisations and community groups to do this.

Really, will they? As far as I can see, health/patient/parent engagement is at a very nascent stage and in many areas, embryonic or not even a twinkle in the eye.

Let’s be hopeful though. If it’s mandated, they’ll have to at least make an effort. Won’t they?

3.2 Keeping provision under review 

Joint commissioning is an on-going process and local authorities and their partner CCGs must keep the arrangements under review.  Local authorities also have a duty to keep under review the special educational provision and social care provision in their areas for children and young people who have SEN .

This will be a full time job for someone. In Surrey, an SEN Quality Assurance officer has been appointed already and so presumably this will be part of the role’s remit.

Two new Health Liaison Posts?

The document talks “Designated Medical Officer for SEN”.  This person might, apparently, be an employee of an organisation such as a CCG or NHS Trust. They will have responsibility for co-ordinating the role of the health body in statutory assessment and MUST work strategically across health, social care and local government.

They must… have good relations with local commissioners who are partners in the joint arrangements for SEN, working to ensure effectiveness in co-operation, and encouraging and supporting the optimum use of flexibilities for joint working (e.g. through partnership arrangements and pooled budgets).

They must provide a means for the local authority to access expert medical advice – for example, on whether or not a child can attend school, or on medical evidence provided in support of a school application – but may also be required to provide or facilitate access to, advice or support for the health community on SEN, particularly when health services are preparing reports on children. Whilst the advice and support may be provided by a number of health and care professionals as appropriate, the designated medical officer must be an identified, qualified and registered medical practitioner, with the appropriate training and/or experience to exercise this role in relation to children and young people with SEN.

The search had better get underway in LAs and CCGs across the land if they’re to stand a hope of finding such a person and training them in the ways of the different authorities they’re supposed to work across.

Social Care Services Liaison person

Another role is a similar function within social care. Social care teams have a range of duties and responsibilities towards children and young people with SEN.

Social care departments may find it useful to designate an officer or officers to support their social care teams in undertaking these duties and to act as the central point of reference for the local authority’s SEN teams on matters related to social care.

Although ‘may find it useful’ may be taken as meaning, sweep it under the carpet, there’s no money in the pot.

Section 4: Local Offer

There is a long section on the Local Offer of services and the document underlines the point that a “Local Offer’ should not be simply a list of existing services but should be used to improve the local offering for children with SEN/D.

The accompanying Regulations document is aimed at providing a common framework for the local offer. They specify the requirements that all local authorities must meet in developing, publishing and reviewing their local offer:

  • The information to be included

  • How the local offer is to be published

  • Who is to be consulted about the local offer

  • How children and young people with SEN and parents will be involved in the preparation and review of the local offer

  • The publication of comments on the local offer and the local authority’s response

There is a lot of information on the proposed Local Offer and SNJ will talk in more details about this in another post but enough to say at this stage that a ‘common framework’ is still not a ‘minimum standard’

5.6 Additional SEN Support

The big question has been what will replace the School Action & School Action + levels of SEN that are being abolished along with the statement.

The answer is here and it’s called  Additional SEN Support

But, to me, it all seems to depend on:

  1. The strength of the school’s SENCO
  2. The training of staff.

It’s fine to say, as the document does, that all teachers should be teachers of children with special educational needs, but we all know that mainstream teachers are trained to be mainstream teachers and a HUGE programme of extra training is going to be needed if there are not structured levels such as exists at the moment.

The document talks about all the tasks that a SENCO should be carrying out, but when my boys were in mainstream, the SENCO (who was great) was also a year head, class teacher, head of PE and Deputy Head.

In my personal opinion, a SENCO should be just that. A SENCO whose sole duty it is to identify, organise, monitor and review the progress of children with an SEN. They should be listening to those children and, where appropriate, organising nurture groups to support those whose support needs may look like a SEN but may, in fact, stem from an unmet emotional or social need.

Additionally, they should be monitoring the quality of SEN provision from the school’s teachers and be liaising regularly with parents (and it does say that in this document).

It’s a full time job all by itself. And they should be part of the school’s senior management team.

Before providing a child or young person with the Additional SEN Support, a rigorous assessment of SEN should be undertaken by the institution using all available evidence/data sources, such as attainment and historical data, the child or young person’s development in comparison to their peers, information from parents and, if relevant, advice from external support services.

How will this be funded? It will be 1. “agreed locally” and be from “the delegated schools budget”, but early on in the select committees they were talking about clawing back the delegated budget. So what’s it to be?

That’s it for now, we’ll have more next week, when we’ve had time to read it in detail.

You can find the DfE main document page here

You can find the Indicative draft Code of Practice here

You can find the Illustrative Regulations draft here

Please do add your opinions in the comments below or on our SNJ LinkedIn group

Co-production is the key to SEN culture change

Tania writes:

Last week I spoke at a top-level conference for council Chief Executives and Leaders from the SE7 – seven local authorities across the south-east of England.

I was there as part of the Surrey pathfinder, to talk about how parent involvement had become integral to the SEN reform process. Parental participation was demanded by the government and in the Surrey pathfinder, it has become much more than just ‘joining in’.

I’d like to share my short speech with you because I know that we, in Surrey and the SE7, are among those leading the way to culture change for everyone involved in special needs & health and social care provision for children and young people.

I’m not saying Surrey has changed yet at the ‘coalface’, but a change is gonna come…

If all this is new to your school, SENCo and local authority, whether you are a parent or practitioner, please read this. As I said in a post the other day, the DfE wants culture change training to start now. But to coin a phrase – if you’re going to HAVE something different, you have to DO something different.

Let me know what your thoughts are in the comments…

***

My name is Tania Tirraoro, co-chair of Family Voice Surrey. I also run a “Times Top 50” website called Special Needs Jungle that aims to help parents whose children have special needs & disabilities.

I started that website as a direct result of the experiences I had of trying to get statements for my own two sons who have Aspergers and other difficulties. It was adversarial, stressful, frustrating, at times emotional – and we had it easier than many, never having to go to tribunal.

In the five years since then, I have heard so many parents describe horrific – and hugely expensive – experiences of battling to get the help their children need. Of quite disgraceful treatment by local authorities, considering that those parents were only asking for support…

I don’t think it’s unfair to say that parents were viewed by professionals as grasping, demanding and, quite frankly, a bloody nuisance – interfering with their jobs ‘delivering’ services to ‘the client’ (in other words, children)

co-production tree

Click to enlarge. Image from http://www.govint.org

Parents have been left at breaking point, bewildered and angry as to why they should have to fight for what you would think anyone would want for any child – the right support provided in a timely manner.

You might look at me and think I’m one of the “sharp elbowed middle-classes” the right-wing press like to sneer at. But that’s not where I came from and I’m in this to help those parents be heard, who don’t even know they’re allowed to have a voice.

So. Here we are. The government decided enough was enough. Things had to change – and what was more, parents were mandated to be a part of it. Imagine that. I can only guess at the gasps of horror from SEN departments across the land.

But, I have to say, and I know Susie [Campbell, Surrey’s Pathfinder Manager] will agree that- in Surrey at least–  the sky did not fall in on County Hall and it’s all working out quite nicely so far.

From a starting point of mutual suspicion that has taken time to overcome, we’ve worked to build up a relationship that has steadily improved – because we wanted it to work.

We now operate what we’re calling co-production – working together as equal partners – this is a revolution in thinking and really, it’s as it should be!

Parents representatives sit on every workstream of the pathfinder and on the Local Change Board.

I have seen guards come down over time and views shared in a measured and respectful way –  but of course it hasn’t all been plain sailing – as in any sphere, it can depend on individual personalities and it’s up to everyone to make sure this is managed.

On the whole, parents have discovered that practitioners don’t have horns and practitioners have discovered that parents have valuable insights that they may not have previously considered. This can only be for the benefit of who this process is all about – the child.

There is still a long way to go with: culture change for many within local authorities and with confidence for parents outside the pathfinder – there’s no magic wand.

But the genie is out of the bottle and when the pathfinder is over, parents aren’t going to away quietly and those with whom I work within Surrey don’t want them to – and neither does the government. We’re already involved in other work for example the Disabilities Expert Group and Gap Analysis for SEN provision.

This is going to be the new normal – But – and this is a big but – it needs to be sustainable.

Parents came into this as hopeful and willing volunteers, but now that the benefits have been realised and we are working as co-producers, local and national government need to look to how they can support the continued involvement of parents as we ALL work together to improve outcomes for children and young people with SEN & disabilities.

***

So – what’s your opinion of the reforms?

And – if you’re in Surrey, see this link for our upcoming conference on the SEN & health changes

The Every Child in Need Campaign – help needed!

A campaign is being launched today (Thursday 26th July 2012) aimed at protecting society’s most vulnerable children from “damaging changes” proposed by the Department for Education.

The Department of Education is proposing wide-ranging changes to the legal framework which protects these ‘children in need’. Although the changes will affect all ‘children in need’ in England and Wales – including all disabled children – they are focused solely on child protection. The proposals are set out in a consultation which runs until 4th September 2012 [details here].

However, a group of charities, campaigners and lawyers, who are today launching :Every Child In Need” say these proposals are wrong-headed, dangerous and will place the most vulnerable children at risk .

The organisations include Maxwell-Gillott SEN solicitors, Ambitious About Autism and child protection charity ECPAT UK. The organisers, between them, work with and reach thousands of children across the country, including disabled children, children who have been trafficked, and others facing challenges such as street homelessness, physical or sexual violence (often gang-related), parental neglect, educational difficulties and behavioural or mental health problems. All of these are children ‘in need’.

The organisers say:

The Department for Education is proposing wide-ranging changes to the legal framework which protects these children.  The Ministers, Michael Gove MP and Tim Loughton MP, say these changes involve cutting ‘red tape’, allowing local authority children’s services departments more freedom to meet children’s needs.  Many local authorities – cash-strapped following swingeing cuts to their budgets – are happy to take this lifeline, which will mean less pressure to act quickly when a child in need comes to their attention.

We disagree.  The legal framework is not ‘red tape’ – it is an essential safety net for children when they are failed by their local authority.  Basic minimum national standards and requirements are essential.  A hands off approach, allowing local authorities to do what they want, when they want, is dangerous.

Even the Government’s own impact assessment (.pdf) recognises this – it accepts that, “there is a risk of negative impact on children if central government is less prescriptive.”  That is not a risk we should be taking.

We believe these changes are wrong-headed, dangerous and will place the most vulnerable children at risk.  Join us and stop these changes.

Although headlined as a consultation about ‘safeguarding’ and ‘child protection’ only, following on from the Munro report, in fact the proposed changes are far wider, impacting upon all ‘children in need’ across England and Wales, and drastically altering the current guidance regarding how local authorities should assess and meet their needs.

Time is short.  The consultation is running over the summer, 12th June – 4th September 2012.  We recognise that the issues are complex and you may have many questions.  We have arranged a campaign and information meeting for Thursday 26th July 2012, to discuss the proposals further and answer any questions.  It will take place at Doughty Street Chambers at 6 – 7.30pm and we very much hope you can join us.

The Department for Education’s wide-ranging proposals are set out here: https://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/departmentalinformation/consultations/a00211065/revised-safeguarding-guidance.  In short, Michael Gove MP and Tim Loughton MP say these changes involve cutting ‘red tape’ and stopping prescription by central government, allowing local authority children’s services departments more freedom.  Many local authorities – cash-strapped following swingeing cuts to their budgets – are happy to take this lifeline, which will mean less pressure to act quickly when a child in need comes to their attention.

We disagree.  The legal framework is not ‘red tape’ – it is an essential safety net for children when they are failed by their local authority.  Basic minimum national standards and requirements are essential.  A hands off approach, allowing local authorities to do what they want, when they want, is dangerous.  Even the Government’s own impact assessment recognises this – it accepts that, “there is a risk of negative impact on children if central government is less prescriptive.”  That is not a risk we should be taking.

The campaign has three central concerns:

(i)            The proposals are based solely upon ‘children at risk,’ but the changes will apply to all ‘children in need’ – a far wider group.  For example, all disabled children are ‘children in need’ but their needs have not been taken into account in the proposals.  There are at least 770,000 disabled children in England and Wales. Why have their needs been disregarded?  How will they be impacted by these changes?

(ii)           The proposals remove national minimum standards for child in need assessments, basic standards which all local authorities must meet.  At the moment there are maximum timescales in place, so that when a child in need is referred to children’s services his or her needs must be assessed within 35 working days at most.  Gove and Loughton are removing this requirement.  We believe that many children in need will be left to languish, without the assessments and services they desperately need – and are statutorily entitled to.

(iii)       The revised statutory guidance proposed in the consultation is hopelessly vague and general, and will not ensure that children in need obtain assessments with a ‘realistic plan of action’.

The campaigners say they are very surprised to see the Department supporting the removal of national minimum standards on the timing and quality of assessments for children in need at this time, when in other contexts they are demanding more proscription and are criticizing local authority decision-making.  They cite as an sample, how Tim Loughton MP recently sharply criticised local authorities for their placement and management of vulnerable young people in children’s homes, and the poor quality of local authority data on such children.

The campaign website is at, www.everychildinneed.org.uk.  Full details of our meeting on 26th July are available at http://www.doughtystreet.co.uk/seminars_events/.

We hope to see you on 26th July.  If you wish to attend please book your place by contacting Doughty Street’s Events Coordinator at 020 7404 1313 or events@doughtystreet.co.uk.