Evaluation of SEND pathfinder report – some nice weekend reading!

senreform2The Children and Families Bill has had a busy week, having a third reading in the House of Commons and then a brief first reading in the House of Lords.

It really would be nice, by the way, if the DfE could provide a little bit better public notice of these events for people who like to follow them.

I watched most of the Commons reading but just haven’t had time to write about it, although many interesting points were raised, particularly by the Labour Education spokesman, Sharon Hodgson and Robert Buckland MP, who has himself worked on many SEND tribunal cases.

If you’d like to watch the reading yourself, you can do so on parliament live TV here

The DfE has now published an “Evaluation of the SEND pathfinder programme” as a nice bit of weekend reading.

This report is the first of two volumes containing the evaluation findings from the first 18 months of the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) pathfinder programme.

To recap:

Twenty Pathfinder sites, comprising thirty-one local authority areas were tasked to develop and trial: an integrated assessment process: a single, joined up ‘Education, Health and Care Plan’; and personal budgets across education, social care and health, and adult services as appropriate for children and young people from birth to 25 years.

Debs and I are parents-carer reps for Kent and Surrey respectively, part of the SE7 pathfinder group.

The evaluation’s key findings highlighted that the pathfinders have invested considerable resource to establish new processes including: the assignment of a key worker so that families have a single point of contact; the development of personal profiles through which families and young people can express themselves; adopting person centred planning approaches; and moving to a single EHCP document.

The general feedback around each of these developments has been positive. Pathfinders appear to recognise the advantages of working differently, and are positive about the impact of the changes.

Both the new process and the underlying ethos were seen as important. The changed approaches were reported to have increased choice and control for families. In all cases they were involved in the development of outcomes and agreeing the plan to meet these outcomes. The challenge of a shift to focus on outcomes was clearly demonstrated, with many key workers reporting finding the development of outcome based plans challenging.

It also noted that further workforce development and support for cultural change will be important moving forward. I should coco! Not only important, but absolutely vital and top of the list. And if we’re finding it a challenge in the pathfinders, imagine the job those other councils outside the trails that groups like the SE7 are to mentor are going to face over the coming months.

Still, I have been mightily impressed by the work being done and the positive approach that I’ve seen and I have high hopes still.

Problems remain however and we will have more to say, of course, about our opinions on this.

In the meantime, if you would like to read the report, you can find the page here

I’m now off to my youngest’s GCSE options evening. Really not sure how he got that old so quickly. Or me!

Government acts on calls for SEN ‘duty’ for health provision in reforms

senreform3The surprising and extremely welcome news today from the Department for Education (DfE) is that there will, after all, be a legal duty on health providers to deliver the provision detailed in the health part of the Education, Health and Care Plan that’s currently being developed under the SEN reforms.

Clinical Commissioning Groups are GP groups who, under the new health changes, will plan local health services and who will be called on to organise the health requirements of an EHCP, including specialist services such as physiotherapy, and speech and language therapy.

Since the first draft legislation was published for the Children and Families Bill, parents, charities, SEN legal experts and local authorities themselves have been expressing concern that there was no duty on health to provide the services in the EHCPs. There was only a duty to “jointly commission” – the ‘abracadabra approach’ – which everyone knew was never going to be enough.

The government has bowed to this weight of expert opinion and today, in a press statement, the SEN Minister, Edward Timpson said,

“We are putting health at the centre of our reforms in bringing in this legal duty. It is a significant step forward for children and young adults with special educational needs, and I know that many parents will welcome it.

The duty will mean that parents, and children and young adults with complex special educational needs, will get the health services that are right for them.”

Christine Lenehan, Director of the Council for Disabled Children said,

“Many children and young adults with special educational needs depend on health services. I am really pleased that their needs are being taken seriously. This legal duty should help to improve their lives.”

However, Health Minister Dr Dan Poulter said:

“We are determined that children and young people should be put at the heart of the new health and social care system. That is why we and many other organisations with the power to make a difference recently pledged to do everything possible to improve children’s health. This is an example of that pledge becoming a reality.”

disability sDr Poulter is the only one who does not make the specification “with special educational needs”. He instead refers to the recent pledge “Better Health Outcomes for Children and Young People

A quarter of all children with disability do NOT have special educational needs but do have significant health needs. They will not be covered under this announcement under the current way the Children and Families bill is worded.

Views on health from the House of Commons Children & families Bill Committee

In today’s HOC Children & Families Bill committee hearing, Srabani Sen, chief executive of Contact A Family, said that including disabled children has the potential to cost less to provide provision because it will be more coordinated and simplified. She said that this is where working with parent-carer forums is beneficial because by involving parents at a strategic level designing services you end up with better targetted services.

In her evidence, IPSEA chief executive, Jane McConnell acknowledged the work that had gone into bringing about a duty on health as it had been previously said it wouldn’t be possible. However, she went on to say that that although now it seemed there would be an Education & Health plan, if put under scrutiy by the Trades Description Act, the proposed EHCP would fail because there is still not a duty on social care.

Mrs McConnell said that this should not be a big step as social care is administered from within the local authority, so it should not be as big a challenge to achieve. If there is, she said, a single entrance into the plan then there should be a a single path to redress.

Mrs McConnell explained that she had been told that the current Tribunal already has the expertise to oversee all three strands of a plan in a dispute over provision so it should be given the power to do just that. Otherwise, there would be a reliance on parents to go to three different points for redress, which, if it is a single plan, does not make sense.

So, a huge step forward, acknowledged on all sides but:

1. Still no duty on social care

2. Still no inclusion of children with disabilities who do not have special educational needs.

What do you think?

Read about today’s other developments in SEN reform – Pathfinder update and champions named, as well as more views from the HOC Children & Families Bill committee

SEN reform views and other news

Yesterday I spoke on behalf of Family Voice Surrey at the Surrey County Council SEN pathfinder launch in Cobham. In attendance was Stephen Kingdom, a senior DfE official. I took the opportunity to include in my talk the widely-held opinion (outside of government circles, that is) that October is FAR too soon to try to start evaluating any pathfinder activity – most of which isn’t even scheduled to start until September. What, exactly, will they be evaluating, I asked him, when I spoke to him afterwards. He said some government stuff about informing, gradual process etc etc, but I’m not sure he was listening, really. Let’s face it, why should I be any different?

They hold the view that putting it off may mean it doesn’t happen. I disagree. The genie’s out of the bottle now but far, far better to have the ‘unstoppable train’ of reform pause a while to let reality catch up, than rush into something that’ll end up running off the rails because it wasn’t given enough time to lay secure tracks to a sustainable SEN future for the kids who need it.

So, enough train metaphors and on to the week’s stories. My blogging pals have come up trumps this week with some great posts from A Boy with Aspergers, Chaos In Kent, An Aspie in the Family and Emma4Oacs. Lots of other great stuff too, take a look!