Parental Co-Production : Your views needed

Our recent post on Parental Co-production really seemed to hit home with many of you.  We received several comments on the blog, on our Facebook page and via our twitter account, so we wanted to expand this and find out more.

smoke-mirrorHave your experiences of parental co-production been positive?  Have you been involved in a project from the beginning and feel that you have really influenced the outcome?

What about with your child – have you (and they) been truly listened to when you have been looking at goals for them and how they can be achieved?  Or did you feel as if everything was decided on your child’s behalf and your views weren’t even considered?

We are looking for parents who would be happy to share their experiences with us.  Or perhaps you are a practitioner who appreciates the value of true co-production but struggle to get your colleagues or manager on board?  Would you be happy to talk on camera via Skype with us?

If you would like to learn more and perhaps get involved, then get in touch by completing the contact form below.  We would really like to hear from you.  Completing the form does not commit you to anything, other than a chat.

Working with parents as partners – a practitioner’s top tips

Debs writes…

The Children and Families Bill, currently working its way through parliament is very big on practitioners in education, health and social care working in partnership with parents – or “co-production”.

Now, this is clearly a fine goal, but it is going to require a shift in attitudes on all sides and an extensive programme of re-training in some quarters as well. For some, it will be easier than for others and there are already examples of great practice that need to be identified and held up as examples for others to learn from.

If you search the web, you will find several parent views on co-production but we thought it would be useful to get the views from a practitioner (we used to call them professionals, but then, what does that make us?) about the challenges, issues and positives of co-production.

Phil Brayshaw

Phil Brayshaw

Phil Brayshaw is a registered nurse for people with learning disabilities and has post-graduate qualifications in child mental health and family therapy. He has worked in health and social care for over twenty years and until recently, was the lead commissioner for disabled children and young people for NHS Calderdale. Phil also led Calderdale’s SEND Pathfinder work before moving to NHS England in April 2013.

We thought he was an ideal person to ask about co-production from the ‘other side’.

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I was really chuffed to be invited to write about working alongside parents from a practitioner’s perspective. As an NHS employee however, I’ve been asked to say that my ‘top tips’ reflect my own views and not necessarily those of either NHS England or NHS Calderdale.

Writing a guest post is new to me, as co-production is to so many of us, and I had a few false starts but I persevered – and that is the key to trying anything new. So, here are my ‘top five’ points to remember.

If you have any questions, leave a comment and I will do my best to answer.

1.     Don’t be afraid to try new things and if they are tough…KEEP GOING!

Co-production is about more than not doing the same things that we have always done, but doing new things together. It’s about talking to each other and working together to find brand new ways of doing things. Doing things differently can be tough, but don’t give up – after all it is better to write a dozen opening lines than none at all.

2.      Be clear about what you want or what you want to achieve

Having meaningful conversations is so much easier if we are all talking about the same thing. People often talk about shared goals and ASPIRATIONS, but these are not always easy to agree on or describe. My advice is to always start with the end in sight. You could try asking, “What would success look like?” In Calderdale, we found the best answers to this question come from children and young people themselves.

3)      Get a sense of what other people need to ACHIEVE and help them achieve it.

Shared aspirations and goals are essential to co-production. There is little point in working together if we are not all heading in the same direction. That said there are often a number of different priorities for families, communities and the various organisations. It can be useful to understand what other people need to achieve, within their families or professional roles.  Helping someone to achieve their objectives often frees up some of their time to help you meet yours.

4)      Learn to TRUST – be open and honest.

If we are going to work together we need to learn to trust each other. In my experience people generally want what is best for children and young people. Believe it or not professionals don’t come to work just to make your lives more difficult [honestly] and parents aren’t unreasonable and difficult on purpose! There is no question that the current system is adversarial and there is little wonder that we are all a little suspicious of each other. Trust will take some time and effort.

5)      Ask for help (and act on advice)

It is okay not to know all of the answers and it is equally okay to ask for help. We are all very LUCKY to have such a wealth of experience around us – in families, communities and services – we need to get much better at using it; And whether you are in a family, community or a service, it is important to remember – it isn’t always the professionals that have all the answers or solutions.

So, SNJ friends, would you like to hear more from Phil?  What would you like him to write about?  We would love to hear your thoughts on this post.  As Phil said, he is happy to respond to any comments and questions below.

You can also contact him directly via Linkedin or @PhilipBrayshaw on Twitter.

Co-production is the key to SEN culture change

Tania writes:

Last week I spoke at a top-level conference for council Chief Executives and Leaders from the SE7 – seven local authorities across the south-east of England.

I was there as part of the Surrey pathfinder, to talk about how parent involvement had become integral to the SEN reform process. Parental participation was demanded by the government and in the Surrey pathfinder, it has become much more than just ‘joining in’.

I’d like to share my short speech with you because I know that we, in Surrey and the SE7, are among those leading the way to culture change for everyone involved in special needs & health and social care provision for children and young people.

I’m not saying Surrey has changed yet at the ‘coalface’, but a change is gonna come…

If all this is new to your school, SENCo and local authority, whether you are a parent or practitioner, please read this. As I said in a post the other day, the DfE wants culture change training to start now. But to coin a phrase – if you’re going to HAVE something different, you have to DO something different.

Let me know what your thoughts are in the comments…

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My name is Tania Tirraoro, co-chair of Family Voice Surrey. I also run a “Times Top 50” website called Special Needs Jungle that aims to help parents whose children have special needs & disabilities.

I started that website as a direct result of the experiences I had of trying to get statements for my own two sons who have Aspergers and other difficulties. It was adversarial, stressful, frustrating, at times emotional – and we had it easier than many, never having to go to tribunal.

In the five years since then, I have heard so many parents describe horrific – and hugely expensive – experiences of battling to get the help their children need. Of quite disgraceful treatment by local authorities, considering that those parents were only asking for support…

I don’t think it’s unfair to say that parents were viewed by professionals as grasping, demanding and, quite frankly, a bloody nuisance – interfering with their jobs ‘delivering’ services to ‘the client’ (in other words, children)

co-production tree

Click to enlarge. Image from http://www.govint.org

Parents have been left at breaking point, bewildered and angry as to why they should have to fight for what you would think anyone would want for any child – the right support provided in a timely manner.

You might look at me and think I’m one of the “sharp elbowed middle-classes” the right-wing press like to sneer at. But that’s not where I came from and I’m in this to help those parents be heard, who don’t even know they’re allowed to have a voice.

So. Here we are. The government decided enough was enough. Things had to change – and what was more, parents were mandated to be a part of it. Imagine that. I can only guess at the gasps of horror from SEN departments across the land.

But, I have to say, and I know Susie [Campbell, Surrey’s Pathfinder Manager] will agree that- in Surrey at least–  the sky did not fall in on County Hall and it’s all working out quite nicely so far.

From a starting point of mutual suspicion that has taken time to overcome, we’ve worked to build up a relationship that has steadily improved – because we wanted it to work.

We now operate what we’re calling co-production – working together as equal partners – this is a revolution in thinking and really, it’s as it should be!

Parents representatives sit on every workstream of the pathfinder and on the Local Change Board.

I have seen guards come down over time and views shared in a measured and respectful way –  but of course it hasn’t all been plain sailing – as in any sphere, it can depend on individual personalities and it’s up to everyone to make sure this is managed.

On the whole, parents have discovered that practitioners don’t have horns and practitioners have discovered that parents have valuable insights that they may not have previously considered. This can only be for the benefit of who this process is all about – the child.

There is still a long way to go with: culture change for many within local authorities and with confidence for parents outside the pathfinder – there’s no magic wand.

But the genie is out of the bottle and when the pathfinder is over, parents aren’t going to away quietly and those with whom I work within Surrey don’t want them to – and neither does the government. We’re already involved in other work for example the Disabilities Expert Group and Gap Analysis for SEN provision.

This is going to be the new normal – But – and this is a big but – it needs to be sustainable.

Parents came into this as hopeful and willing volunteers, but now that the benefits have been realised and we are working as co-producers, local and national government need to look to how they can support the continued involvement of parents as we ALL work together to improve outcomes for children and young people with SEN & disabilities.

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So – what’s your opinion of the reforms?

And – if you’re in Surrey, see this link for our upcoming conference on the SEN & health changes

Politics and personalities in the SEN jungle

Like me, my co-contributor, Debs Aspland, grew up in the call-a-spade-a-spade, working class, north-west of England.  Also like me, she has far too much to do trying to juggle work and care for her special needs children to have any time for the politics and game-playing that has so often, in the past, made lives difficult for parents trying to cut their way through the special needs jungle.

In this post, our Debs who, you will remember, is Director of Kent’s parent-carer forum, Kent PEPS, explores the different personalities we meet as parents and individuals in our daily lives and how thinking about this – and your own approach – can help you navigate the system to get the best help for your child.

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Any change, even a change for the better, is always accompanied by drawbacks and discomforts.

Arnold Bennett

Any change, even a change for the better, is always accompanied by politics and personalities.

Debs Aspland

True co-production with parents is a goal that came out of Aiming High.  The Department for Education allocate a small grant each year to a Parent-Carer Forum within each local authority, with the remit that they work with health, education, social care and other providers to ensure that the services they provide are the services that families want and need.  Fantastic, what a great way forward!

However, the DfE forgot to tell the health, education, social care and other providers that they had to work with the Parent-Carer Forums.

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