Contact A Family extends free benefits helpline service

CaF logoThe brilliant charity, Contact a Family, is from today offering an extended helpline service.

Contact a Family has long been a source of information about the benefits system for parents of disabled children, however now – thanks to three years of funding – they will be able to offer more personalised advice for parents living in England.

From today (June 3), if you get in contact with CaF, they will be able to offer you an appointment with their welfare experts to discuss your situation. They will then be able to take you through the latest relevant benefits advice and run through any other financial help you may be entitled to maximise your income.

Senior Parent Adviser and welfare rights expert, Derek Sinclair said:

“At a time of huge change to the benefit system, this will provide a badly needed source of  free, confidential, high quality and up to date advice for parents. Our advisers will make sure that parents have the right information to make informed choices about issues.”

These include:

  • moving into work
  • benefit options when a child reaches 16
  • or how to use self-directed support to take greater control over how services are provided to their disabled child.

Contact a Family will also be offering a series of workshops across England  to raise awareness of the new benefits system. Get in contact with your nearest office  to find out more.

You can also access their quarterly welfare update in their What’s new e-bulletin and a range of resources to help parents make sense of the benefits maze. Sign up to receive your free copy.

Contact the CaF team of experts on freephone helpline number 0808 808 3555, email them on helpline@cafamily.org.uk or post a question on their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/contactafamily

You can also:

  • Watch our video – meet the parent advisers and find out how they can help

Place2Be – the charity that makes a lifetime of difference to children in schools

A while ago, I came across a great charity, working across the country to improve the emotional well-being of children, their families and the whole school community. The Place2Be was established in 1994 in response to increasing concern about the extent and depth of emotional and behavioural difficulties displayed in classrooms and playgrounds.

Today, Jonathan Wood, Place2Be  National Manager, Scotland, tells Special Needs Jungle about their work and why it is so vitally important:

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Why school-based counselling support works: Place2Be

You are a busy classroom teacher, juggling the demands of a young family at home with a boisterous class of 8 year olds at school. Your class takes a lot of energy to settle down for work each morning – and at each subsequent break throughout the day.

It’s Monday morning and Amy is in tears again, even before the bell has gone. Recently fostered after a placement with her grandparents ended violently, you have to remind yourself that it is only a year since Amy’s mother died from a drugs overdose. If you didn’t, your exasperation might seep out as you comfort her just enough to get her into class.

Once in there, disorder rules. At the heart of it, two boys are baiting each other. One of them, Sam, is not going to back down. You suspect he is somewhere on the autistic spectrum, as yet undiagnosed – that mix of over-sensitivity and bullishness – and his feelings have been hurt. And Amy’s crying again.

The other children have responded to your presence and start to settle down. So that just leaves Sam and Amy and you to deal with.

How do teaching staff cope with extra-curricular demands of this nature? Who offers them support to ride the emotional roller-coaster that whizzes and plummets through the school curriculum on bad and not-so-bad days?

In Place2Be’s experience, most teachers cope by simply carrying on. Support for the emotional impact of children like Sam and Amy can be hard to come by.

Founded in 1994, Place2Be provides a whole-school service, offering therapeutic and emotional support to children and parents, and on-site consultancy formally and informally to teaching staff. We work with 500 schools across the UK. How would we respond in this situation?

We might expect to meet up with this teacher at break or lunchtime and talk through with her how her morning went. We may suggest strategies for her to support Sam, including that he come and see us in Place2Talk, our drop-in, solution-focused self-referral sessions for children (10 minute sessions at break time). We may bring forward Amy’s session with her Place2Be counsellor, recognising that she is not coping well at the moment. We may simply listen to the teacher.

And indeed, Sam did come to the Place2Talk and together we worked out painstakingly and rationally how he might take control of similar situations and not rise to anyone’s bait. And over the next few weeks, Amy played intensively with the doll’s house in the Place2Be room, in which she installed dolls representing herself, her mum and her grandparents. There were fights and tears, but it wasn’t until a new set of parents moved into a room in the house that Amy’s mum and grandparents could move out, leaving her there. Amy’s foster parents have since applied to adopt Amy, and the tears before class have stopped.

Teachers know that some children arrive at school not ready to learn. But knowing that is not the same as having the time, the resources or even the skills to manage all the issues that children can bring.  This is where a service like Place2Be can make the difference by attempting to provide that responsive space for schools at every level in a direct and non-stigmatising way.

Find Place2Be here

New website to increase SEN charity awareness

Today, I have a guest post from Martin Peel, who has launched a new site highlighting SEN charities.

“We have recently launched a new website, www.sencharities.org, to increase the awareness of Special Educational Needs charities within England, Scotland and Wales. There are more than 200 such charities in the UK, many of which were established by the parents of children with Special Educational Needs.

Typically these charities are small in size and often run by dedicated groups of volunteers. Finding support for your child with Special Educational Needs is not always easy, often resulting in the question “Who can I turn to for help?”.

These charities provide a first point of contact for this help and by increasing awareness we hope that this will result in additional donations to aid them in their work. For more information about the website please email sencharities@live.co.uk or phone 07833 088202.

We are very grateful to our website sponsor, SpaceKraft of Shipley, West Yorkshire (www.spacekraft.co.uk) who are part of RM plc. Over the last 19 years SpaceKraft have designed and installed more than 3,000 Multi-Sensory Environments for children with Special Educational Needs.

www.sencharities.org has been developed by Health Charit Ltd, a not for profit fundraising company for health charities. For more information about Health Charit Ltd please go to www.healthcharit.org, email martin.health@live.co.uk or phone 07833 088202.