Take the SEN reform awareness survey and grab a chance to win!

Debs writes...

sen reform special needs jungleOver the past 12 months, we have received a deluge of questions and queries about the SEN reforms.  From this, we can only assume that the word is not getting out to parents (or practitioners) about the changes that are coming.

As we don’t like to assume anything (the words “ass” “u” and “me” spring to mind), we wanted to find out exactly how much you do know about the  SEN reforms including the proposed Education, Health & Care Plan, the Local Offer and Personal Budgets.

We have put together a survey – SEN Reforms: How informed are you?

Please take a few minutes to let us know what you know.  There is the option to add additional comments if you wish to some of the answers, but this is not required. We just know that many of you have a lot to say!

Anyone completing the survey has an opportunity to enter into a prize draw to win one of five copies of the E-book version of Tania’s “Special Educational Needs – Getting Started with Statements“.  You can download it in most formats or PDF if you don’t have a e-reader or app.*

We will publish the results along with posts answering some of the questions.

Please share the survey with as many friends and colleagues as possible – it would be really good to get a national view.

Access the survey in your browser here or go to our Facebook page and take the survey there

 

*Make sure you enter your email address to be in with a chance to win. 

Ebook winners will be chosen at random after the survey has closed at 5pm on 12th June 2013 and notified by email and sent a single-use only download code for the ebook from Smashwords. You may, of course, donate your winning code to someone else instead of keeping it for yourself, but it is only valid for one download. The ebook may not be transferred to anyone else after download.

Poll results – Should children with Asperger’s automatically be statutorily assessed?

Last year I published a poll on this site asking whether people thought children diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome (quick, use the term before it’s abolished!) should automatically receive a statutory assessment by the local educational authority.

I posed three potential answers:

  1. Yes, because teachers aren’t trained to spot underlying difficulties
  2. No, we should just see how they get on
  3. No, we should trust the school to decide what level of help they need

Now, I assume that most of my readers are parents with SEN children but there are also readers who have a professional interest in SEN, so I admit that the results may be skewed somewhat. Having said that, a whopping 96 per cent of respondents thought that AS is so complex in its presention that children with that diagnosis should receive a professional, school-based assessment to determine their special needs.

This isn’t to say that they should all be statemented (or get an EHC Plan as it will be), but most respondents believed that it is important to understand what their needs are and how they can be met to level the playing field, giving them an equal chance of success at school and beyond.

3% though we should see how they get on and just 2% thought that teachers were best placed to decide the level of help required. There were more than 150 responses.

I am a firm believer that school success and success as an adult does not depend on academic achievement alone. We all hope that our children, whether they are ‘normal’ or whether they face additional challenges, will grow up to be rounded, socially adept individuals. Even in this age of web interconnectedness, knowing the correct social response in a face to face meeting is still vitally important. We are, after all, social beings.

I know this only too well from my own sons. Even though our eldest is incredibly bright, we could see that he had many social difficulties and these, in turn, affected his school experience and academic achievements.  We did not want him to turn out to be an angry alienated genius and, thanks to interventions, support and the right school, he won’t be. Without an assessment that I fought for and drove forward, we might still be asking ourselves.. but he’s so bright.. why does he do this or that, it makes no sense.. (I’ve talked about his issues previously, with his agreement, now he’s a teenager I have to be careful what I say).

I say whatever you call Asperger Syndrome in the future, and whatever you replace statements with, when parents suspect their child has social difficulties they should always raise the issue with teachers and do their own research as well.

Some difficulties experienced by children with high functioning ASD can seem obscure and hard to verbalise. Yet if they go unaddressed, they can end up having a long-term negative impact on a child well into adulthood. I believe that every child on the spectrum should have an Ed Psych or Outreach assessment so that teachers who are not experts in autism (nor would most claim to be) can be given help to ensure that every pupil they teach has a fair chance of a decent learning experience.

Have you ever applied for a Statementing Assessment for your child? If so, take this poll!

I’m carrying out a poll into how people fare when they initially apply for a Statutory Assessment for their child. If you’re been through it please take the poll and share the poll with as many people as possible. The results will be published in the New Year. Thank you!

Should children with Asperger Syndrome automatically be statutorily assessed?

What’s your opinion – should children diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome automatically be statutorily assessed? I think they should because despite seeming to ‘cope’ in a regular class, so many children suffer psychological difficulties that goes unrecognised in busy classrooms. An assessment could open doors for them to get the psychological and educational support they need to thrive.

Others may say of course, that they should be left to get on with things and only have intervention when really thought to be needed. My argument against this would be that teachers are not sufficiently trained in spotting the difficulties encountered by AS children (and why should they be – they’re mainstream teachers after all, not special needs teachers) and in order to access the curriculum to their best, it would take an expert to assess them. Then, the correct level of help can be determined and the child has the best opportunity to get the right help.

Or maybe you have a different opinion on this? I’ve set up a poll on poll daddy for you to give your opinion Either way – please take the poll at the link below or leave a comment.. or both!