Mindfull: A new online mental health service for teens

Tania writes…

A new online service for adolescents with mental health problems is being launched today (Friday 5th July 2013).

mindfull logoThe service at mindfull.org is aimed at young people aged 11 to 17. It’s offering advice, support and the chance to talk online and confidentially with counsellors.

The young person can choose the type of support they receive and, because MindFull is online, it is available anywhere at anytime whether it’s counselling, self-help or mentoring from another young person who has been in a similar position and is now able to help others.

Young people can suffer a huge range issues that stem from depression and  anxiety such as self-harm, anorexia, bulimia, substance abuse and even suicide attempts. The root cause may not be clear to see but there will be a root cause (physical and/or emotional) that needs to be addressed as much as its effects.

MindFull is here to help you get better; and we’ll also give you tools and tips to help you get through those tough times that may arise in the future. We know that asking for help is not always easy, but MindFull is a safe and trustworthy space where you can choose the right support for you.

However you feel, remember that you’re never alone: when you’re ready to talk, were ready to listen. MindFull is open every day, between 10am and midnight.

Launch video


Young people often find it difficult to start conversations about their mental health problems, fearing they won’t be taken seriously or be told just to “get over it” or “pull themselves together”.

Then, when they do pluck up the courage to open up about their feelings, a concerned parent may take them to the GP who may refer to CAMHS, the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service. As many of us know, the quality of CAMHS can be variable and a bad experience can make matters worse.

Helping as a parent can be  easier said than done

At present we are involved with CAMHS and have, this time round, been pleasantly surprised although this hasn’t been the case in the past and I know many of you have had bad experiences

Child mental health is a growing issue and any service that can help is to be welcomed. As a parent, it is of course, always best to foster an environment at home where your children can feel comfortable tackling difficult subjects with you. Sometimes it’s best just to keep your own mouth shut and not feel you have to solve your child’s problems right off the bat – non-judgemental listening is what is needed.

Oh, but that is SO easy to say, isn’t it? Even as I typed that, I was thinking that I needed to learn how to do that – I know what’s needed, but I just want so badly to ‘fix’ all my children’s problems that I go about things in the wrong way and then berate myself later.

I am what’s known as ‘A Rescuer’, ready to leap in and save any situation from disaster. I hate to see others’ suffering and pain because I feel it myself. I bet I’m not alone in this. And although sometimes it works out, with your children, they may not tell you in the first place and when they do, they need support but not fixing. They have to find their own way and although parents can be a vital source of strength, they will almost always need impartial help as well or instead.

If you care for a young person/people either as parent /carer or in a professional capacity, take a look at this service and pass it on. It’s a tough old world out there and our youngsters need all the help they can get.

You can find Mindfull on social media at the following locations:

BBC Radio 4’s Today programme had two interesting features about this this morning. You’ll be able to listen again later today at this link.

Read other SNJ posts about child mental health:

What has your experience been like? Do you think a service like this is a good idea?  Add your comments and opinions below!

A personal take on depression: Would you recognise it in your child?

Tania writes

It’s Depression Awareness Week, although with the state of the economy and the weather, it wouldn’t surprise me if most of the country was painfully aware of feeling a bit in the dumps.

Ah, see what I did there? Of course, there’s a difference to being a bit blue and being clinically depressed, and for parents of young adults, teenagers and even younger children, it is very important to know the difference.

For example, what is the difference between your child just having a bad day, or your teen often being irritable or secretive because that’s all part of hormones and growing up, and the onset of something more intractable that will require careful attention and treatment?

Granddad

Granddad

I was diagnosed with clinical depression at the age of 16, although I had always been an anxious child due to an often uncertain home-life. For me, I can trace the true onset of major depression back to the death of my beloved grandfather, who suffered an unexpected and fatal heart attack in front of me when I was just 12.

The adults were allowed to grieve; I was told to ‘put it behind me’, although how I was expected to have the skills to get over the shocking death of the only male constant in my life is beyond me. My, now late, mother, many years later, told me that, in retrospect, she regretted the way she had handled it, but in fairness, it was 1980, and things were different then.

That evening, I had to call the ambulance for my gran and explain what had happened. I was staying with them over February half-term, while my sister was at our Dad’s house.

The trauma of it still revisits me though, even now after adult therapy. It’s still raw, 33 years later. It makes you less able to cope with adversity in a healthy way. The detail is still etched on my mind. It changed me, irrevocably.

Today, I’m great in a crisis, but I pay for it afterwards – a delayed reaction. I’m ever-vigilant, the fight or flight response never far from the surface. It’s not an easy way to live.

Some Shocking Statistics*

  • 1 in 10 children and young people aged 5 – 16 suffer from a diagnosable mental health disorder – that is around three children in every class.
  • Between 1 in every 12 and 1 in 15 children and young people deliberately self-harm  and around 25,000 are admitted to hospital every year due to the severity of their injuries.
  • More than half of all adults with mental health problems were diagnosed in childhood. Less than half were treated appropriately at the time.

Depression can often be part of illness

Anxiety and depression are also features of Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, with which both Son2 and I have now been diagnosed, so I was predisposed, in any case.

Son2 hasn’t had any trauma, but with EDS and Asperger’s it was almost a dead-on cert that he would be affected. He has acute anxiety problems, but because of my experiences, I knew what to look for and he is receiving treatment. It won’t ‘fix’ him, but it may help give him coping skills.

Son1, who also has ASD, has anxiety issues too. On the face of it, he looks like he’s coping well with help from his specialist school, but I know it’s still there, waiting to trip him up and so parental vigilance is needed.

Luckily for both of them, their father is the ultimate laid-back Dad (or in their speak, “soft as a pillow”), so they have a great male role model and a close-knit family. Even that, I know, is not always enough.

This is the first time I’ve ever written about my own depression and it isn’t easy. I’ve been embarrassed, not wanting to show weakness. I can barely utter the words ‘mental illness’ in relation to myself. But just recently, since I’ve been ill, I’ve had to do a lot of reassessing. I expect I have felt the same way teenagers feel when they don’t want to admit they are depressed or that there is anything bothering them at all.

Just because your child or young person hasn’t suffered a huge trauma such as family break-up or bereavement does not mean they are not at risk of mental illness. Lack of confidence, being bullied, poor body image, difficulties at school can all be factors.

And that’s not even taking into account any special needs they may have such as Asperger’s, dyslexia or other learning problems that can affect self-esteem. Or they may just be genetically predisposed to it, especially if you or their other parent are affected.

young minds logoAs a parent, you need to know what you’re looking for and Young Minds, the mental health charity for young people, have lots of resources on their site for parents and for young people themselves. Take a look, even if you don’t think your child has a problem. Parents are often the last to know so knowledge is power. There is also a section for teachers on recognising and helping young people with mental health problems.

The usual NHS route for young people with mental health problems is via your GP and then to CAMHS, the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, but as you can see from the comments in this post that is a very variable service, depending on where you live. I really would advise checking out the Young Minds site as well.

I shared just some of my story to help raise awareness that depression can happen to anyone, at any age. But when it happens to a young person, without a vigilant adult, their problems can spiral out of control catastrophically. Self-harm is becoming more common, anorexia and other eating disorders are almost certain to include depression and far too many families are torn apart by the loss of a young person to suicide.

Teenagers are notoriously poor communicators; they are working on growing up and away, if they are able. Be watchful, be informed, keep talking. If you can’t do this without arguments, try this book, the 1-2-3 Magic for surviving your teenagers. It will show you how to begin to see them as young adults in their own right, and no longer just your little ones.

If you’d like to share your experiences, resources, tips or knowledge I’d love to hear them!

* Source: Young Minds

Teenagers and suicide- a growing challenge for our times

Mental health in adolescents with or without special needs is a growing concern and a particular interest of mine.

I found an article on MedPage Today about a survey of teens who had been treated for suicidal thoughts and mental health problems that indicates they are still at risk of attempting suicide. This, to me, says that  just because you have sought help for your young person in this situation, you can never afford to think the problem has gone away.

sad boyParenting teens is, in so many ways, much more difficult than parenting younger children. A balance must be found between watchfulness and intrusion. They naturally do not want to share their inner thoughts with their parents and keep so much more to themselves. They often think that they should be able to sort out emotional problems for themselves, when they are in no position to do so alone. (more…)