Mindfull: A new online mental health service for teens

Tania writes…

A new online service for adolescents with mental health problems is being launched today (Friday 5th July 2013).

mindfull logoThe service at mindfull.org is aimed at young people aged 11 to 17. It’s offering advice, support and the chance to talk online and confidentially with counsellors.

The young person can choose the type of support they receive and, because MindFull is online, it is available anywhere at anytime whether it’s counselling, self-help or mentoring from another young person who has been in a similar position and is now able to help others.

Young people can suffer a huge range issues that stem from depression and  anxiety such as self-harm, anorexia, bulimia, substance abuse and even suicide attempts. The root cause may not be clear to see but there will be a root cause (physical and/or emotional) that needs to be addressed as much as its effects.

MindFull is here to help you get better; and we’ll also give you tools and tips to help you get through those tough times that may arise in the future. We know that asking for help is not always easy, but MindFull is a safe and trustworthy space where you can choose the right support for you.

However you feel, remember that you’re never alone: when you’re ready to talk, were ready to listen. MindFull is open every day, between 10am and midnight.

Launch video


Young people often find it difficult to start conversations about their mental health problems, fearing they won’t be taken seriously or be told just to “get over it” or “pull themselves together”.

Then, when they do pluck up the courage to open up about their feelings, a concerned parent may take them to the GP who may refer to CAMHS, the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service. As many of us know, the quality of CAMHS can be variable and a bad experience can make matters worse.

Helping as a parent can be  easier said than done

At present we are involved with CAMHS and have, this time round, been pleasantly surprised although this hasn’t been the case in the past and I know many of you have had bad experiences

Child mental health is a growing issue and any service that can help is to be welcomed. As a parent, it is of course, always best to foster an environment at home where your children can feel comfortable tackling difficult subjects with you. Sometimes it’s best just to keep your own mouth shut and not feel you have to solve your child’s problems right off the bat – non-judgemental listening is what is needed.

Oh, but that is SO easy to say, isn’t it? Even as I typed that, I was thinking that I needed to learn how to do that – I know what’s needed, but I just want so badly to ‘fix’ all my children’s problems that I go about things in the wrong way and then berate myself later.

I am what’s known as ‘A Rescuer’, ready to leap in and save any situation from disaster. I hate to see others’ suffering and pain because I feel it myself. I bet I’m not alone in this. And although sometimes it works out, with your children, they may not tell you in the first place and when they do, they need support but not fixing. They have to find their own way and although parents can be a vital source of strength, they will almost always need impartial help as well or instead.

If you care for a young person/people either as parent /carer or in a professional capacity, take a look at this service and pass it on. It’s a tough old world out there and our youngsters need all the help they can get.

You can find Mindfull on social media at the following locations:

BBC Radio 4’s Today programme had two interesting features about this this morning. You’ll be able to listen again later today at this link.

Read other SNJ posts about child mental health:

What has your experience been like? Do you think a service like this is a good idea?  Add your comments and opinions below!

What’s your experience of CAMHS?

Many of our children have to be referred to CAMHS – The Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service – to help manage their behavioural difficulties or perhaps if they are experiencing a difficult period of depression or anxiety.

After a very difficult Year 8, largely due to an issue with a particular teacher about whom the less said the better, we found ourselves in this position with Son2, who has Asperger Syndrome. He was referred by his paediatrician at the end of last year.

The paediatrician, it later transpired, in the battery of blood tests ordered, had not included a Vitamin D test and so missed that part of his issues stemmed from a severe Vitamin D deficiency. This was only picked up by our forward-thinking GP, when Son2’s legs began to cause him pain some weeks later.

So, we wait for the CAMHS appointment. And wait. And wait. Meantime, Son2 was finding it difficult to go to lessons and is on many occasions, unable to go to school at all, a stressful situation for the whole family.

Then eventually, an appointment arrives, SIX MONTHS after referral. My husband takes the day off and off we go. At the appointment is the paediatrician and a CAMHS psychologist who shall remain unnamed to save their blushes. Son2, predictably, refuses to speak to either of them.


We explain Son2’s issues, as the paediatrician yawns through the whole appointment, then takes a phone call. At an appointment we have waited six months for. I studiously ignore him. The psychologist agrees to prescribe a trial of a particular medication and says she will call the school to speak to his counsellor there before we get it filled. However, to the best of my knowledge, she does not and we are left with an unfilled prescription a week later, still waiting to hear back from her. I call and leave a message. No response. So, I decide to get the prescription filled although Son2 will only agree to take it after I take him back to our GP who explains to him the effect it will have on him and that he will soon start to feel better, something, presumably, the psychologist should have taken the time to do.

Within a couple of weeks, indeed Son2 is feeling better and even manages to go to the local shop by himself for the first time in a year. But there is still no word from the psychologist and we are coming to the end of the bottle. I call the GP who agrees to prescribe a further bottle, even though this is supposed to be a monitored trial.

Off we go on holiday, where Son2 has a couple of relapses but is generally much better. When we return, there is still nothing from the psychologist, so I call my GP again to ask who should be monitoring Son2 as we have heard nothing, nor have we received a follow up appointment. She checks her screen and has a recent letter scanned in that says Son2 had been referred to the wrong county sector of CAMHS and had been re-referred to a different local region. They had not bothered to cc us in because, of course, as the child and his parents, we are the least important people in this process, it would seem.

I am incensed. And as David Banner used to say just before he turned into the Incredible Hulk – don’t make me angry. You wouldn’t like me when I’m angry.

I call the new department to find out what is happening and, to avoid my call going ignored again, I  pass on to the lady who takes my details that I am also co-chair of the local parent-carer forum and a response would be appreciated, as I am extremely unhappy at this rather careless administration when they are dealing with a vulnerable child who has been prescribed some serious medication.

An hour later, a lady calls me, very concerned that I shouldn’t be complaining about them and I assure her that it’s not them at fault, but the other CAMHS section. We now have an appointment for 25th September. So, because of this mistake in referral Son2 will have had three months with no monitoring for a child who was only put on an initial trial of an SSRI.

It doesn’t bode well for the future for an integrated health, education and care plan if they can’t even figure out where you should be referred. And at the heart is an autistic boy who has been suffering since the end of last year. Parents should not have to chase for information, it’s very distressing, because it makes you feel very alone and insignificant.

Because of my position, I happen to know the head of CAMHS in our county (a very sincere person, in my experience) and I emailed her to tell her about the whole sorry tale. As I expected, she was horrified and apologised, assuring me she would ensure Son2 received the right treatment and that she would also take steps to make sure this did not happen to anyone else.

However, I am not sure my experience of CAMHS, in any county, is particularly unusual, or even especially bad, and I would be interested in hearing your story too.