How to talk to Tigers

How to talk to Tigers?  Why are Special Needs Jungle posting about Talking to Tigers?  It really doesn’t sound like our usual post, does it?

How to Talk to Tigers is written by Jacob Tilley.  Jacob spent seven years living in the forests of India learning how to roar and growl (or so his bio says).  He then decided to write a book about this and he invited Ruby Thompson to illustrate it.  Ruby is a young girl who has autism

2013-03-02 11.29.49

K enjoying a good read

“How to talk to Tigers” is one of those books that as you read it, you know everyone will interpret  differently.

Initially, for me, I was purely looking at the images and thinking “wow”.  It made me remember that we should never limit our expectations.  The illustrations are colourful and fun.

Then my eldest, K, picked up the book and started to read it out loud.  He was in fits of laughter.

The book describes how to talk to “tigers” in different moods, e.g. how to talk to a poorly tiger, how to talk to an angry tiger, a naughty tiger….  you get the idea.  It’s written in rhyme scheme (i.e. the first line rhymes with the second, the third line rhymes with the fourth, etc) and my kids love this and as a mum, I love reading this out loud – so easy and fun.

I think for K, rhyme scheme just makes sense.  There are no shocks, no surprises, lines will rhyme and this is perfectly logical to him.

As K continued to read, between giggles, my youngest son, J, shouted out “this should be called how to talk to K”.  We all laughed but then I read it again later and I realised that J had a point.  One of the lines talking about an “excited tiger” was “they fly through windows, swing from door frames, knock over chairs” and I wondered if there was hidden CCTV in my home that Jacob had access to   So many of the chapters had lines I could relate to, especially the “Happy Tiger”.

I loved this book and it has become one of those that my children often ask for.  We have learned it verbatim by now and so I only have to read half the line and the kids finish it.  We’ve also had some role playing and even K  got involved.  He pretended to be an angry tiger which as any mum of a child who has ASD will appreciate, was a moment of pure joy for me.

What books do your children enjoy?

He did it! Son1, 15, made the summit of Kilimanjaro!

Tania writes…

Luca Kili

Son1, Luca, made it to the summit with other team members

For those of you who have been interested in Aspie Son1’s expedition to Africa, a quick update.

He made it to the summit of Kilimanjaro! He wasn’t alone, of course. Luca was one of seven boys and three team leaders in their group to make the very summit, Uhuru Peak, Africa’s highest point on 23rd July 2013.

I had heard the numbers already from the wonderful Suzi at school, but did not know if Luca was among the ones who had made it to the very top as, despite strength and training, there are many factors that can intervene.

Congratulations to Luca and to all the boys who made the ascent, in both teams, shepherded by teachers, Sherpas and the action men from World Challenge, whether they managed the final push or not. Let’s not forget, they are all at a specialist school, although those still with physical difficulties would, of course, not have chosen to make the trip. And, they are all aged 15-17.

They have already laid a classroom floor and dug drainage trenches at their twin school, got to know the children, played football with them and cooked for them. They are now on safari before returning home next week.

I dreamed on Thursday night I was with my boy and he told me then he had made it to the top. It was such a vivid dream that I knew it must be true. But real-life confirmation came from Will Scrace’s mum, Collette, and made me burst into tears with relief – many thanks to Collette.

Thanks to everyone who has commented with kind words here and on Facebook – it’s really appreciated and will be something I can show Luca when he returns. If you’d like to leave a comment, that would be brilliant – they’ve all worked so hard.

Happy weekend!

Expedition Roll Call: (Added to when and if permission given)

Team 1: Luca Tirraoro, Will Scrace, Chad White

Led by: Richard from World Challenge, Mick Johnson from MHS

Team 2:

Led by:    

Kili teams

The teams before departure

 

 

Parental Co-Production : Your views needed

Our recent post on Parental Co-production really seemed to hit home with many of you.  We received several comments on the blog, on our Facebook page and via our twitter account, so we wanted to expand this and find out more.

smoke-mirrorHave your experiences of parental co-production been positive?  Have you been involved in a project from the beginning and feel that you have really influenced the outcome?

What about with your child – have you (and they) been truly listened to when you have been looking at goals for them and how they can be achieved?  Or did you feel as if everything was decided on your child’s behalf and your views weren’t even considered?

We are looking for parents who would be happy to share their experiences with us.  Or perhaps you are a practitioner who appreciates the value of true co-production but struggle to get your colleagues or manager on board?  Would you be happy to talk on camera via Skype with us?

If you would like to learn more and perhaps get involved, then get in touch by completing the contact form below.  We would really like to hear from you.  Completing the form does not commit you to anything, other than a chat.

Is parental co-production just smoke and mirrors?

Tania writes…

If you’re a regular reader of Special Needs Jungle you will know what big advocates we are of parental co-production when decisions are being made about services for our special needs children.

A booklet all about co-production in the South East SE7 pathfinder, compiled by all parties involved including parents, defines Co-Production as “Co-production is one approach within participation and in SE7 Parent Carer Participation is welcoming parent carers to the strategic decision making process as full partners from the start”

You can download this booklet yourself here.

smoke-mirrorThe reforms are now moving into a second phase in the pathfinder areas where those local authorities and parent carer forums involved are working out how to implement the ideas they have been testing out. At the same time, some of these pathfinders have been named as ‘champions’ and are tasked with guiding the non-pathfinder authorities how to get with the programme.

All along, we’ve said here on SNJ that cultural change is the key to making a success of the reforms. That you could change all the laws you wanted to but nothing would be any different unless the LA staff carrying out the new system fully bought into the new person-centred, outcomes-focused ethos, where the parents’ and the children’s views were central to the process.

The reforms were needed in the first place because of the bruisingly adversarial and expensive practice that had built up over the years where many working in SEN seemed to think that taking on parents and their special needs children was some sort of gladiatorial sport. And ‘was’ is the wrong tense, sadly. It’s still going on all over the country, right now, despite the reforms speeding along faster than a Japanese bullet train.

At one of these ‘champion’ meetings recently, a non-pathfinder LA staff member was heard to remark, “Why can’t parents just be parents and professionals just be professionals?” In other words, we like the system the way it is, with us in charge and the parents in their place.

This viewpoint is not unusual and, I am disturbed to report, it’s not even unusual in the very areas that are leading the reforms. Many of the people who should be leading the new way forward , injecting culture changes with positive enthusiasm, have either never got fully on board or were just pretending to be in favour while quietly hoping they would soon be able to say, “Oh, yes, parental co-production. We tried that last year. We didn’t like it. It took too much time. We’re too busy giving them what we think they should have.”

So, in order for these reforms to make a jot of difference, a rapid and urgent process of ‘re-education’ needs to begin. Actually, it needed to begin at the same time as the reforms began to be developed.

…Most of parents have additional needs themselves..,, the problems we come across regarding health are dealt with in house …there’s no need to bother the parents about stuff like that… [Précis of comment from a senior SEN practitioner at a recent reform conference. Name withheld to save their blushes.]

But who is going to lead this massive undertaking? Who is going to make all these people, many very senior, have a complete change of heart and begin to openly welcome parents at the decision-making table, to value parents’ views as highly as they value their own and those of their ‘professional’ colleagues.

Nothing, I fear, short of the threat of job loss and maybe not even then, is going to do this. These views that parents should only vaguely be seen (preferably from a distance) and definitely not heard are so very deeply entrenched. And if they are still held within pockets of some, if not all, of the pathfinder authorities after 18 months of reform development, how the bloody hell are we going to change them in those authorities who are completely new to the whole idea in the remaining time before Royal Assent?

And how long will it be before having parents at the table becomes tiresome? After all, we know their views, they’re just the opposite to ours, aren’t they?

They are hoping, no doubt, that parents and those fantastic, hard-working LA staff who do believe in this reform (because there are many) will become exhausted, marginalised and may give up, and the role of parents will become minimised and then, non-existent. Again.

I urge the Department for Education and Mr Timpson to take this warning very seriously.

Your reforms are in grave danger of becoming a battleground of dashed hopes and disillusioned and furious parents who have worked so hard, turning up for meeting after meeting, even when so often, half those LA and most of the NHS staff nominated to go didn’t put in an appearance.

Mr Timpson, you must make it your business to oversee a firm policy of ‘change your ways or leave’ for those within SEN up and down the country who think they can just wait it out and go back to business as usual. It’s like giving us a fab new toy but saying you can’t be bothered to get us the right batteries so it works properly.

Taking a firm stance is the ONLY way because the stakes are too high for thousands of parents and vulnerable children whom you profess to want to help.

And I do believe you want to make a difference. I do believe that your department wants to make a difference. But if you do not take speedy and deliberate steps to ensure a change in attitudes of the people who will administer the new system on a daily basis, I fear that it will be back to business as usual with parental co-production becoming a fond but distant memory.

The TES SEN Show – SNJ will be there! (Early bird seminar offer)

You might have seen a logo top left on the site about the TES SEN Show in London on 11th & 12th October.

SNL12-mini-imageThe big news is… SNJ will be there! Large as life, Stand 45, me and our Debs and maybe some other contributors as well, as it’s over two days. Even better – it’s FREE to attend the show and  workshops.

There are also seminars which attract CPD points for practitioners and there is an early bird rate until 24th July so don’t delay!

We’re so excited to be invited and are currently figuring out what to have on the stand – but you can guarantee we’ll cover lots of SEN resources about the things we write about – and of course the very excellent SNJ pens! It’s worth coming just for one of those.

We aim to be the most informative stand at the show – so why not let us know what kind of resources you think would contribute to a great stand in the comments below?

Check out the information below for all you need to know whether you are practitioner or parent. And don’t forget to stop by and say hello if you visit!

TES Special Educational Needs Show, London
Business Design Centre – 11th and 12th October 2013

Come celebrate a world of SEN at the UK’s longest running SEN show!

 image001

TES Special Needs London is back this autumn and it’s bigger and better than ever. It has the resources, ideas, advice and CPD to provide teachers, SENCOs, support staff and parents with the tools and skills to help all achieve their goals.
Special 21st year

  • Join us to celebrate 21 years of being 100% dedicated to SEN. Celebrations include VIP/Celebrity host, My SEN mobile app, Cake, Presents, special show discounts and competitions galore.
  • New CPD Seminars Always 100% dedicated to SEN: within our inspiring 2013 CPD seminar programme you will learn about the latest issues from top SEN professionals.
  • Fantastic free workshops
  • Discover thousands of resources to compare and buy for every kind of special and additional educational need.
  • In celebration of our special 21st birthday, we are giving all those attending the fantastic ‘My SEN’ mobile app that will ensure you get the most out of your TES SEN show experience. My SEN will be available for download to all attendees in August.

Register for free and get your hot seminars tickets now before the summer holidays begin!
Early bird discount ends 24 July after which only standard ticket price will be available.

  • Visit our new website for all the latest news.    

 

Special Educational Needs Reforms – sorry, what?

You know us, we talk about the reforms to SEN currently going through parliament. A lot.

It’s important stuff and if done properly, will revolutionise the experience of future generations of SEN children. And parents – i.e., you and us, are fully (in some areas) involved with the process.

pushchair[Cue screeching of Mclaren Major and wheelchair tyres…]

We’e sorry, what? What the heck are we talking about? You know, the SEN reforms! You know almost nothing? No way!

Yes way… And how do we know this? Because we ran a survey to find out. And not only was knowledge about the reforms much lower than it should be, but almost three-quarters of people answering were worried that the changes would mean their child would end up worse off, losing provision.

The results are in, and it would appear that the DfE and local authorities need to seriously address the issue of communication.

  • 90% of respondents were parents, the other 10% were either practitioners (7%) or parents who are also practitioners (3%).
  • 66% have a child who currently has a statement and 19% had children on School Action or School Action +
  • Of those who had a statement, 15% had to go to SEND tribunal to either get a statement or to get a statement fit for purpose.
  • 174 people responded to our survey (thank you). Of these respondents, 61% lived in Pathfinder areas. Our highest responses came from SE and NW England.

surveygraphic1One finding that we probably didn’t need a survey to find out is that the cost of a Tribunal is high – both emotionally and financially. Especially when LAs often insist on purchasing extremely costly external legal representation. This is one of the reasons why parents welcomed the aspirational Green Paper way back in 2011.

So why, then, do only 10% of our respondents believe the Government is doing the right thing with the proposed changes and 45% of respondents believe this is not the right thing? Some replies:

The government is working on the incorrect assumption that all schools care about SEN students”

Rushing the Bill through before the Pathfinders have done their work is wrong”

The new Bill does absolutely nothing to address the problem of inadequate resources or how to make LAs accountable”

Question: Is the Local Authority you live or work in a Pathfinder?

This was a real eye opener. Almost half – 48% – of all respondents did not know. Even more shocking, 41% of those who were in Pathfinder areas didn’t know and 4% said they were not. So within Pathfinder areas, 45% of respondents did not know that their LA was a Pathfinder.

Question: Have you been involved in developing the SEN reforms in your area?

6% of all respondents had been involved extensively (this was slightly higher at 9% in Pathfinder areas). However, 67% of all respondents had received no information from their LA (via any method) about the SEN reforms, this was only slightly lower at 59% for those who lived or worked in Pathfinder areas.

  • 50% of all respondents knew very little or nothing at all about the SEN reforms – and this was the same in Pathfinder areas which is really concerning.
  • 72% are concerned that their child will lose provision under the proposed changes.
  • Only 8% are convinced that children and young people will have the same legal rights
  • Only 31% know where to go to find more information, 41% do not know where to find it within their own LA.

I am shocked as to the number of teachers and parents who know nothing about this, especially SENCOs”

surveygraphic2The Local Offer

71% of respondents knew nothing, or very little, about the Local Offer – this was only slightly lower in Pathfinder area (66%).

We asked what people thought the Local Offer was and overwhelmingly, parents believed it was either just related to Short Breaks or cash related. Some responses:

Set amount of money per child with SEN”

An amount of cash held by the council for people with SEN within their area to be allocated as they see fit”

This is to do with Short Breaks, like we had under Aiming High – what short breaks are on offer locally

Only three people responded with any real accuracy: “A web based “mind map” of the journeys families take and how to access help along the line“. Several people still presume there will be a resource directory – which was met with ridicule based on past experiences.

  • 71% did not know who would be able to access the Local Offer (67% in Pathfinder areas)
  • 42% were engaged with their local Parent Carer Forum (but many commented that they would now be contacting them to find out more)
  • 53% knew nothing (or very little) about the proposed EHCPs
  • Only 8% think the School-Based Category (to replace School Action/School Action+) is a good idea, but 51% admitted that they did not know enough to make an informed decision
  • 66% knew little or nothing about the offer of Personal Budgets (this was 67% in Pathfinder areas)
  • Over 50% were unsure about whether Personal Budgets were a good or bad idea.

I think the idea is really good but there MUST be good LOCAL support for families, provided by people who know the area – not a national box-ticking company”

surveygraphic3Keyworkers

In the Green Paper, there was lots of mentions of Keyworkers for families and families were all delighted. However, once the draft Bill arrived along with the draft Code of Practice, Keyworkers became a good idea but not essential. We asked if families should be given the option of a Keyworker to support them through the process and should this offer be a requirement, rather than a recommendation and 76% said yes. In Pathfinder areas, this rose to 81% – and that speaks for itself.

We asked people to give general comments throughout the survey and I have chosen my particular favourite.

“What needed to change was LA/LEA/School accountability to parents and children so they delivered what they were supposed to deliver. The law in itself was good – it was just the power to enforce pre-tribunal that was weak”

It wasn’t a huge survey but still, there is much to be taken from it regarding the views and level of awareness of parents. Some of the changes were needed (e.g. education to 25, not having to wait 26 weeks for a statement) but the biggest change needed is culture change and the proposed Bill does nothing to address this (even if Mr Timpson has spoken of its importance). If it ain’t in the Bill, it means nothing.

So we would like to ask HOW will the DfE and Local Authorities ensure that parents, children and young people are involved and informed? This Bill is travelling fast so time is limited; they need to take action now.

Congratulations to the 5 winners of the e-book version of Tania’s “Special Educational Needs, Getting Started with Statements.” Emails with single use codes to download your book from Smashwords ebook hub will be landing in your inbox in the next few days.

Pie Charts: Marco Tirraoro (Financial Modeller & Business Partner Extraordinaire)

Pupil ranking plans are an epic fail for SEN children

Oh dear.  We’ve always said communication is an issue with the SEN reforms but it’s fairly obvious that it spans education as a whole.

Can someone please let David Laws and Nick Clegg know about the reforms going through and let them have the memo about “promoting inclusion”.

When the Department for Education launched the Green Paper, two of their proposals were to give parents a real choice of a range of schools and give children with statements the right to express a preference for any state-funded mainstream or special school.

However, this morning Mr Laws and Mr Clegg have announced a consultation about plans to change performance measures for schools.

  • Pupils aged 11 would be ranked in 10% ability bands across the year group
  • Test results would be divided into bands of 10%
  • Parents will be told how their child “measures up” to their peers
  • A tougher minimum level of achievement for schools (below which an Ofsted inspection would be triggered
  • This is currently 60% for Sats tests but would rise to 85% under the proposed change

So, let’s just consider this.

  • Would a mainstream school realistically welcome children with SEN if this could risk bringing their minimum level of achievement below 85%?
  • As a parent of a child with SEN, I already know that my child is not achieving at the same rate as their peers.  Will introducing a new measurement help them to do better?
  • How would a young person with (or without) SEN, who has tried to the very best of their ability, feel when they find out that their hard work wasn’t good enough and they were banded in a low percentile?  Will introducing a new measurement help their often already-fragile self-esteem?
  • Is it just a rumour or do all children develop at different rates, based on their age and family dynamics?   Will introducing a new measurement put a stop to that nonsense?
laws

Epic Fail, Mr Laws

Speaking on BBC Radio 4 Today programme, Schools Minister, David Laws said he thinks that levels such as 2a, 3b, “Mean almost nothing to parents,”  

Well, here’s a suggestion, why not just explain to parents what they do mean?  That would be an awful lot cheaper and as a parent of three children, I found out what they meant (and any parent who is interested in their child’s progress will have done the same).  

Therein lies the issue, there will always be parents who are more engaged than others and introducing new methods of measuring children’s achievements won’t encourage parents who are not engaged to suddenly become the type of parent who pushes their child to do better.

Mr Laws also said that the individual score won’t be published nationally and children won’t be told the results, only the school and parents will know.  How does he think parents will find out how their child measures up?  Would that be a letter being sent home via their child’s school bag because we all know that children will never look at them?  Or are we going to put the results online and password protect them – because no child can ever access the information that way, can they?

And parents are not going to discuss it with each other or their friends within ear-shot of the kids? And the kids aren’t going to just ask outright? Or brag if they got a great score within the hearing of less able or SEN children?

This has to be, in our opinion, one of the worst thought-out proposals to have come out of Westminster for quite some time!  Transition to Secondary is an issue for all children, especially those with SEN.  However, the proposals being presented today show a real lack of understanding of children, SEN, parents, schools and inclusion.

If I was to score this proposal, in the manner being proposed, it would definitely be in the 0-10% band.  Mrs Laws and Mrs Clegg, I am sorry to have to tell you that your sons are performing way below their peers (but don’t worry, we won’t tell them if you don’t).

Summer’s here: Where are we in the SEN reform process?

Tania writes

Well, good question.

The answer is we’re here, there, everywhere and nowhere, depending on which county you live in.

cdc_timpsonjuly2013As the long summer break approaches (and enjoy it while it lasts as Mr Gove has it under his microscope – though I can think of better places for his microscope) let’s take a look at where we’re up to.

This is an easy exercise, as Ed Timpson, the Minister in charge, who certainly seems to be a very genuine and well-intentioned person, has written today to the Council for Disabled Children with his own round-up of the broad facts.

You can download the letter for yourself here but to summarise:
  • The Children & Families Bill has now completed the House of Commons stages of the Children and Families Bill and has just completed second reading in the House of Lords. Ed Timpson said, “I have very much welcomed the engagement of many sector and parent-carer organisations in the careful scrutiny of the Bill clauses. The debates in the Bill Committee and in the House were rightly challenging but also constructive.”
  • The CDC has worked with the DfE and produced a leaflet explaining in more detail the reforms to the SEN funding system. The leaflet explains clearly that the funding changes do not change the legal responsibilities of schools and local authorities for children with special educational needs.
  • The indicative Code of Practice has been published and a full consultation will begin in the autumn.
  • CDC and DfE have been discussing the arrangements for reviewing Education, Health and Care Plans, especially the reports parents and young people receive about annual review meetings and the year 9 transition reviews.

As we develop the Code of Practice, it will be important to write it in a way that supports a real improvement in outcomes for those with SEN in schools and colleges in order to meet the Department’s wider aims to improve attainment and close the gap. Ed Timpson MP, Education Minister.

  • The DfE is now thinking more widely about implementing the reforms, and how to manage the changeover to a new legal system from September 2014. It is not proposed to move wholesale to the new system from September next year; rather it will be the beginning of a period of gradual and orderly transition to full implementation.
  • The pathfinder champions are now holding their first regional meetings to support non-pathfinder areas, and have recently shared core learning points through a series of information packs, which can be found here
  • The DfE will be providing £9m in 2013-14 to support local areas to prepare for implementation.
  • Evidence from pathfinder experience and evaluation reports have emphasised the value of early engagement with parents and parent carer forums. (Hurrah!)
  • The DfE will be publishing more information in early autumn to continue to support implementation.
  • Additionally, not mentioned in the letter, the 20 pathfinder areas have all developed or are still developing their own versions of an EHCP and Local Offer, Personal Budgets, Transition plans and so on. Lots of money spent, lots of work carried out and quite a number of minds changed on both parent and practitioner sides about one another.

All very nice (or as my SEN barrister friend Gulshanah, would say sweetly and with a ton of barely-detectable cynicism, ‘That’s lovely, isn’t it?’

Recently, SNJ published two posts raising concerns in the bill, none of which seem to have been addressed so far. You can read the posts here and here to see the issues that remain. The letter doesn’t answer these questions, with the exception of the Annual Review question which is under further consideration. To make for easier reading, we’ve combined them into one easy to download PDF

senreformmontageWe do hope that these problems and omissions will be tackled in the autumn as the next parliamentary stages are started, as Mr Timpson says himself, “I am aware that there will still be some areas that you and others in the SEN and disability sector will want to see evolve further as we start the next Parliamentary stages in autumn. lt is very much the right time to raise these points so that we can continue the constructive dialogue between the Department and the sector.”

We, and we hope, you too, will be continuing to work as much as possible on influencing the bill through the channels that we are part of. It is so important to stress that everyone concerned with the bill has an opportunity to make their voice heard. For parents, this is most likely to be through their local parent-carer forum.

For parents who have SEN children,the upcoming consultation of the Code of Practice will be a huge opportunity to have your say. This is where the rules and regulations will be written and if your child doesn’t have a statement/EHCP, this is even more important. Read the draft – you don’t have to do it in one go, take the whole summer to comb through it and make notes.

Your voice may be the one that makes the difference. It’s easy to complain when you don’t like something, much harder to do something about it so if you are in a position to, do make your voice heard.

Later this week we will be publishing the results of our survey into how much SEN/D parents and carers know about the SEN reforms. They make for startling reading. As a taster:

  • 40% of respondents in Pathfinder authorities did not know if their area was a pathfinder or not.
  • 60% of those in Pathfinder areas had heard nothing about the Pathfinder
  • Just over 50% do not feel they know enough to say if the school-based category is a better idea than School Action/School Action Plus

We need as many parents and carers to be as informed as possible, whether or not they can be or want to be involved. Local authorities, schools, colleges, children’s centres need to do a better job of funnelling information through to parents about the reforms and about their local (voluntary and over-stretched) parent-carer forums.

There’s no space to tell you how to do that, though as an experienced charity PR, I have plenty of ideas. I would hope every Local Authority’s Comms Department do too!

Kilimanjaro Update – no casualties so far!

Tania writes…

A quick update on the 17 boys, all with some form of special needs, including my eldest, who’ve headed off from More House School in Frensham to climb Kilimanjaro and build facilities at their twin Shia School in Tanzania.

They’ve all arrived safely, are haggling and buying their own food and cooking for themselves, doing acclimatisation treks to prepare for the climb and even practising some Swahili. No casualties reported so far, though I am still worried that five pairs of pants for a month just isn’t going to cut it.

Below is from the front page of this week’s Surrey and Hants News by journalist Henry Ascoli who asked if he could focus more closely on Luca so that the readers would understand more about what a challenge it is for these boys in particular.

Fingers crossed they stay safe and I’ll let you know how they get on.

For me however, the challenge will be to get his younger brother into school for the rest of the week before Founder’s Day on Saturday, a morning that is always a test of endurance, high emotion and anticipation seeing which parents have deepest pockets to bid on the yearly auction (Hint: it won’t be us).

It’ll be hot, so I advise any new parent at our school to have fans, water and tissues (for joyful tears) at the ready, as the boys (all 400+ of them aged 7 to 18, except for those below) collect their end of year certificates and we laugh as Mr Yeoman pokes cruel, yet caring, fun of the sports teachers once again.

Kili

Research links gluten sensitivity to autism

This report is from Medscape Today and is about a study in PL0S One. Links at the bottom.

gluten freeA subset of children with autism have increased immune reactivity to gluten, but the mechanism of this increased reactivity appears to be distinct from that involved with celiac disease, new research shows.

The results also indicated an association between elevated antibodies to gluten proteins and the presence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in the affected children.

“There is evidence that immune system abnormalities are associated with symptoms in a substantial number of individuals with autism,” senior author Armin Alaedini, PhD, assistant professor of medical sciences in the Department of Medicine and the Institute of Human Nutrition at Columbia University Medical Center, New York City, told Medscape Medical News.

“In addition, several studies have evaluated gastrointestinal symptoms and defects in GI barrier function in affected patients. Some have pointed to higher frequency of celiac disease, family history of celiac disease, or elevated antibody to gluten among autistic children, but these studies have been inconsistent about such associations,” Dr. Alaedini said.

Read the rest of the Medscape Today report here (You may need to register for free if the whole content is not immediately visible.)

The study was published online June 18 in PLoS One which is an open access journal.

I know many of you are not surprised by this report – do you follow a gluten free diet with your children? If so, what results have you seen? Leave a comment – we’d love to hear and share your views on this.

 

 

Mindfull: A new online mental health service for teens

Tania writes…

A new online service for adolescents with mental health problems is being launched today (Friday 5th July 2013).

mindfull logoThe service at mindfull.org is aimed at young people aged 11 to 17. It’s offering advice, support and the chance to talk online and confidentially with counsellors.

The young person can choose the type of support they receive and, because MindFull is online, it is available anywhere at anytime whether it’s counselling, self-help or mentoring from another young person who has been in a similar position and is now able to help others.

Young people can suffer a huge range issues that stem from depression and  anxiety such as self-harm, anorexia, bulimia, substance abuse and even suicide attempts. The root cause may not be clear to see but there will be a root cause (physical and/or emotional) that needs to be addressed as much as its effects.

MindFull is here to help you get better; and we’ll also give you tools and tips to help you get through those tough times that may arise in the future. We know that asking for help is not always easy, but MindFull is a safe and trustworthy space where you can choose the right support for you.

However you feel, remember that you’re never alone: when you’re ready to talk, were ready to listen. MindFull is open every day, between 10am and midnight.

Launch video


Young people often find it difficult to start conversations about their mental health problems, fearing they won’t be taken seriously or be told just to “get over it” or “pull themselves together”.

Then, when they do pluck up the courage to open up about their feelings, a concerned parent may take them to the GP who may refer to CAMHS, the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service. As many of us know, the quality of CAMHS can be variable and a bad experience can make matters worse.

Helping as a parent can be  easier said than done

At present we are involved with CAMHS and have, this time round, been pleasantly surprised although this hasn’t been the case in the past and I know many of you have had bad experiences

Child mental health is a growing issue and any service that can help is to be welcomed. As a parent, it is of course, always best to foster an environment at home where your children can feel comfortable tackling difficult subjects with you. Sometimes it’s best just to keep your own mouth shut and not feel you have to solve your child’s problems right off the bat – non-judgemental listening is what is needed.

Oh, but that is SO easy to say, isn’t it? Even as I typed that, I was thinking that I needed to learn how to do that – I know what’s needed, but I just want so badly to ‘fix’ all my children’s problems that I go about things in the wrong way and then berate myself later.

I am what’s known as ‘A Rescuer’, ready to leap in and save any situation from disaster. I hate to see others’ suffering and pain because I feel it myself. I bet I’m not alone in this. And although sometimes it works out, with your children, they may not tell you in the first place and when they do, they need support but not fixing. They have to find their own way and although parents can be a vital source of strength, they will almost always need impartial help as well or instead.

If you care for a young person/people either as parent /carer or in a professional capacity, take a look at this service and pass it on. It’s a tough old world out there and our youngsters need all the help they can get.

You can find Mindfull on social media at the following locations:

BBC Radio 4’s Today programme had two interesting features about this this morning. You’ll be able to listen again later today at this link.

Read other SNJ posts about child mental health:

What has your experience been like? Do you think a service like this is a good idea?  Add your comments and opinions below!

Asperger’s, anxiety, Angels and an African adventure

Tania writes:

Eighteen months ago, Asperger’s Son1 signed up for the trip of a lifetime.

His special(ist) school had joined up with World Challenge to organise a month-long expedition to Tanzania in Southern Africa. Participants would carry out project work in their twin school, Shia school, go on safari but most importantly, climb to the summit of Kilimanjaro.

Kilimanjaro

Destination Kilimanjaro

The school, More House, in Frensham, educates boys from 6-18 who have a variety of learning difficulties. They are bright boys, but may have dyslexia, Asperger’s, dyscalculia, dyspraxia and other similar disabilities and have a different learning style to that in mainstream. The school has a growing Learning Development Centre with an expert OT department.

So, a trip up a 5,895 meter mountain, the highest in Africa, is not going to appeal to every year 10-12 student. Especially the part where they had to raise the £4k plus cost themselves.

But Son1, whose difficulties are social and communication rather than physical (apart from a lifelong tendency to fall over nothing and break stuff just by looking at it) was up for it. He took part in the training and the fundraising and learned valuable skills along the way.

brotherly love

A brotherly farewell

And it hasn’t been only him who has had to learn skills – I have tried (and often failed) at not transferring my own anxiety to him. Anxiety is one of his major difficulties but he has learned to hide it to fit in and so it comes out in other ways, often aimed at us. We have learned to understand this and to breathe deeply and not shout back.

And so, today, 18 months later, the day of departure has arrived.

Top Dad, a former Royal Marine Reserve, has had endless fun “helping” (okay doing) the kit prep. He confessed that for weeks he’s thought it was him going up the mountain and is now devastated to realise he won’t be going himself.

Amber good luck Angel

Amber good luck Angel

So, checklist: Good luck amber angel and laminated angel prayer from (loopy) mum? Check. Immunisations? Check. Epipens for allergies? Check. Passport, visas, paperwork, four season sleeping bag (it’s freezing at the top), walking poles? Check, check, checkety check check.

Me with Son1

Tania with Son1

Tension has been high for the last 24 hours with Son1 answering every parental enquiry with a snappy, tetchy response. Anxiety hovered uneasily over Tirraoro Towers.

He said farewell to Son2, who is at home again, having decided school activity week is boring and not for him, thank you. He is an elegant school refuser. No shouting, no tears, just a polite decline.

kitcheck

Last minute adjustments from Top Dad

Anxiety joined us in the car on the way to school. I got a half hug when we got there, Top Dad was refused one. And then he was gone.

Will I see my amber angel again? Will we see Son1 again? Stay tuned. For those of you who have a spiritual side, here is my Angel prayer for my precious boy.

I  call on you, Archangel Metatron
And as many angels as needed
To protect my son, Luca on his travels
To surround him with protective angelic arms
And keep him from harm
And return him to me safe, healthy and happy
Guide him to get the most from his journey
And to gain in wisdom, compassion and spirituality
Help him to think ahead before he acts
And to keep going when he wants to give up
But most of all to enjoy his time
And know that we are all thinking of him
Thank you.