Highlighting your SEN Beacons of Good Practice

Debs writes….

beaconWhen we visited Mr T last week, along with other mum bloggers, we discussed the excellent help that several of us had experienced (as well as those aspects of the system which had failed us).  We then talked about  how this information could be developed into “Beacons of Good Practice” that the Government could highlight as examples to other areas who may not be doing so well.

Who you would nominate in your area?  I am lucky because I would be able to point out a few “Beacons” with ease.

The first one that springs to mind is our “VI pre-school worker”, an equivalent of Portage for VI children in Kent.  When your child is born with a disability or SEN, you often don’t know quite what to do for the best, where to go for advice or information, what to expect for your child with educational provision or even their mobility and independence.  As J was born with a specific diagnosis, we didn’t have to look for the help we would need, it just arrived – in the form of Peggy, our VI pre-school worker.  Our Specialist Teaching Service in Kent offers a service specific to children with VI and when they are notified of such a child, they make the contact with the family so the family doesn’t have to start looking for them.  How much easier this made our life.

Peggy was our pre-school worker or as we liked to call her “the lady who brings the fun” and she made it all so much easier for us.  She also allowed us to “enjoy” our son.  So often, fighting to find the help you need makes your child a burden and you become his carer, secretary and advocate.  Having Peggy took a lot of that away and we got to enjoy J’s early years immensely

I can still remember the issue of encouraging J to walk.  With most young children, you hold out your arms and give them big smiles and even demonstrate what you want; obviously with J this wasn’t an option.  However, I also remember not worrying about this because I knew I could ask Peggy.  She was great, she had loads of ideas, lots of suggestions and more importantly, was able to advise that it would take patience from all of us. We worked tirelessly for months and then J rewarded us by taking his first steps independently towards Peggy during one of her visits; I can still remember how loudly we all cheered and how pleased he was with himself.  Peggy shared with us that this was a first for her – to see one of the children she supported take their first steps – and I know that this is recorded on her visit report in his file, so it made me feel like we had given something back to her in return.

jamieOne of the most rewarding things was that Peggy always involved J’s twin sister when she visited.  When we were trying to work on J’s touch and sensitivity, Peggy kindly brought along warm spaghetti, rice pudding and jelly for J to play with.  We sat there with the nice separate pots but J was not interested so Peggy suggested that R play with them – at which point my beautiful daughter promptly mixed them all together and then threw them in the air.  Our faces were a picture.  The “sketti mess”, as it became known, landed on J’s head and slid down his face.  We watched in horror, waiting for the scream but instead we got the deepest, most infectious belly-laugh ever.  J then proceeded to help his sister throw the “sketti mess” around the room whilst shouting out “sketti mess” (and we did not have laminate flooring or a leather sofa) but his fear of touch was addressed!  Making R part of the visit and activity was just one of Peggy’s talents, she totally understood that J was a part of our family and we all needed to be involved with him and his development for it to work well.

Peggy was not just our VI pre-school worker, she was also our key worker – even though that was not her specific job title.  She knew the world of VI inside out and happily shared the information with us.  What really helped was that she gave us the information when we needed it.  We were not inundated with leaflets, books and advice enmasse (which is often the case), we were provided with the relevant information at the relevant time.  Every family is different and some of us like to think ahead and some like to live in the moment so, having a key worker (or a practitioner who knows the benefits of key working) ensures that the family gets the most appropriate person-centred service.

Our Specialist Teaching Service – VI provided exactly what a family in our position needed.  We had support, advice, and information  available, when we needed it.  It provided us with someone who helped us when it came to nursery and someone who knew the local schools and actively played a role in J’s transition.  The success of this Good Practice is easy to see – spend an hour with J and meet this confident, outgoing little boy who is keeping up (and sometimes ahead) of his sighted peers.  He is a bit cheeky and a tad outspoken – but then again, he is my son and I wouldn’t have him any other way.  If you read my post about J’s diagnosis, you will see how much life has changed for us since we first heard the news.  Without the Specialist Teaching Service – VI, I doubt we would be in the same place as we are now.

So who would be on your list of Good Practice?  In Kent PEPs, we recently launched Good Practice Awards so parents could tell us when they were happy with a service, maybe you have something similar in your area?

Over the next month or so, we will share with you our other Beacons of Good Practice but we want to hear from you – what works well in your area?  What service made a difference?

A video about the Surrey SEN reform Pathfinder

Tania writes:

Here’s a video made by the DfE about when Ed Timpson, the SEN Minister, came to Surrey. It features families and young people trialling the Education, Health and Care plan and two key people from the Surrey pathfinder whom I greatly admire, Susie Campbell, Surrey’s Pathfinder Manager and Julie Pointer, Transition Development Manager.

If you find it difficult to understand what the reforms are all about through reading the documents, have a look at this video and you will learn lots about what is planned for the whole of England.

Let us know what you think!

 

Special Needs Jungle meet SEN Minister, Edward Timpson

So the big day arrived and of course, it was raining. Tania and I headed into London, to the Department for Education, to meet the Education Minister in charge of the SEN reforms, Ed Timpson.

Unfortunately, there was ‘the wrong kind of ice’ on the conductor rail and  so I sat at Waterloo for half an hour while Tania updated, “At Wimbledon and moving”, “Now at Clapham”, all the time watching the clock.

Eventually we arrived, and the lovely Jon arrived to escort us up to Mr T’s office.  While we waited for the Minister to finish another meeting, Jon introduced us to some mums who blog about their own special needs children and who’d come along via Tots100 – one all the way from South Wales and another from up in Manchester. Hats off to them for making the effort!

We received a very warm welcome from Mr T, who didn’t look at all daunted by the prospect of meeting several passionate SEN mums.  Then again, perhaps he missed his vocation in life and an Oscar could have been his for the taking if he had chosen a different career route.

snj-ET

Debs (left), Mr Timpson, Tania

The mums gathered had children with varying difficulties and were at different stages of the process of trying to secure support, but the main thrust was of the outrage and distress parents felt when they were forced to fight for what their disabled children needed.

The Minster asked us to share with him one thing we would change or we considered an issue.

The one thing that was very noticeable was the amount of nodding heads from all of us as each person relayed their concerns or suggestions – it was very clear that as parents, we all know our children and we’ve all had similar experiences and issues.  The solutions we suggested were all similar too.

I felt a genuine sadness that the bad bits – the bits  you think only happen to you or in your area – were  happening to many others across the whole of the country

Parents often feel they are not an integral part of any decisions made about their child – often they are talked at, rather than talked to.  The whole process can become, and often is,  adversarial, with parents feeling that it is often just a case of the LA showing us who is in charge.  As parents we want to engage and play a role in our child’s life but legislation alone won’t make this happen.

Aside from Tania & myself who, as you know, are involved in our own areas developing plans for SEN reform as part of the pathfinder, one mum was taking part with her family in the trials themselves (and we’re looking forward to hearing more about it from her soon) while others were less knowledgeable about the stage the reforms are at. I suspect that may soon change!

It was telling that most had felt a lack of support and signposting but there were several mums who could point to excellent help they had had and we think this could be developed into “Beacons of Good Practice” that the government could highlight as examples to other areas who may not be doing so well. What a great incentive, to have your service win such an accolade!

Tania & I raised our concerns about the massive task of culture change needed to drive forward the Children and Families Bill and to ensure it meets the outcomes it was initially designed to produce, but more positively, we also tried to offer some solutions to that and will be sharing our ideas and contacts.

Key working (and a named key worker) were the one thing we all agreed with.  Parents want to have the confidence that practitioners within different agencies (and sometimes practitioners within the same team) will actually speak to each other. As that doesn’t happen at present and there are not clear signs that it will be happening anytime in the near future, there was also the recognition that parents need someone who is just there to help them (independent advocates), someone who knows the system and the resources available, someone who can be your guide through the local offer.

charlie

Charlie Mead

Another point your intrepid SNJ advocates raised was the huge potential for “nurture groups” to create a backbone of support for vulnerable and troubled children within schools.  Children sometimes present with what appears to be an SEN, but this can be exacerbated by unmet emotional or social needs.

When given the right support through this type of group, can then integrate back into universal services.  Tania talked about the great work that child psychologist, Charlie Mead, has done with the use of nurture groups in a previous post – Special Needs Jungle in the Telegraph – what I really think and we hope that Charlie will be able to share his experience with Mr Timpson, who was extremely interested in the concept. If commitment and funding for nurture groups can be mandated or at least added to the Code of Practice, this could be a real way to help families and children succeed.

Generally, the meeting was very positive.  Mr T did appear to listen to what we were saying and he was very keen to stress that the Code of Practice was an “indicative” draft, which will be informed by the findings from the pathfinders and SEND pathfinder partners.

desperatedanHowever, as parents who don’t often get to bend the ear of “The Man That Can”, this was our chance to indicate to Mr T and his trusty team that the indicative draft is at present rougher than Desperate Dan’s chin.

We will be working with other parents and practitioners to try to influence plugging the gaps and, in fact, Tania is attending a Code of Practice workshop next week.

We were given the contact details for the Minister’s team and asked to let him know of anything that was working well and were all told to “keep blogging”.

We can promise him, and everyone else, that we most certainly will.

Draft SEN Code of Practice: Further views

Debs writes….

As the Indicative Code of Practice was published, I was in Guildford delivering Early Support’s Key Working in Practice capacity building training.  I was lucky to have ten amazing ladies attend, all of whom understood the benefits of key working and working in partnership and wanted to see this working in their own areas.  I walked away from the training feeling really positive about what the future could look like.

After a long journey home – does the M25 ever NOT have roadworks? – I sat down and started to wade through the new draft CoP and regulations.

Edward Timpson - junior minister in the Department for EducationI was initially hooked by the line in 2.1 Introduction (A Family Centred System) “Parents know their child best” and I would like to thank Mr T for getting this line into print – it was long over due.  We don’t always claim to be an expert in our child’s diagnosis; we merely claim to be an expert in our child.

However, as I progressed through the new documentation, I started to feel a tad unsure.  It sort of feels as if “this is the goal” but there is no detail on what steps will need to be taken to reach that goal, nor does it feel as if there is any real understanding of the huge culture (and operational) changes the LA & PCT staff and families are facing.

2.3 Parent Partnership Services

“These services should be available to all parents of children and young people with SEN”.  Now, before any PPS staff reading this start shouting at their PC or phone, I happen to be a fan of Parent Partnership Services, I think they offer a great deal of support to families.  However, in several areas the PPS have seen huge cuts.  In Kent, we lost almost 50% of our service last year (while hearing rumours of increases in the tribunal staff – a really inspiring message for parents).

Cuts in a service offering SEN information, advice and support to parents, at a time when the new legislation is raising so many questions and concerns for families, is just nonsensical (and perhaps even disrespectful to the families who need this support).  How will PPS be able to ensure their services are available to ALL parents of children and young people with SEN with a reduced workforce?

In some areas, the PPS currently offer the Disagreement Resolution Service but the new COP states clearly, with regard to this service, that local authorities “should ensure that the service is impartial and it must be independent of the LA”.  Not all PPS are independent, even if , in theory, they operate at arms-length.  This is not a criticism of PPS, but a criticism of LA officers who just cannot understand that in order for a PPS to be truly effective and deliver the service that families need, they need to let go!  However, this  comes down to Politics and Personalities instead of achieving the outcomes for children, young people and their families

2.4 Parent Carer Forums:

“Local authorities and other service providers should work in partnership with parent carer forums”.  This is where “should” and not “must” comes in to play.  The COP says effective parent participation happens when the engagement of parent-carers is valued, planned and resourced – but doesn’t clarify how this should happen.   It states in 2.4 that PCFs should be involved in the preparation and review of the Local Offer but in section 4. The Local Offer, there is no mention of the forums, nor are they mentioned in the regulations regarding the local offer.   There is the “must involve parents, children and young people” line, but this will allow the LA to cherry-pick the parents who they know and trust not to challenge them and that won’t help some families.

5.1 Improving outcomes for all

“All children and young people SHOULD have an appropriate education” not MUST have.  “All education settings SHOULD have high aspirations for all children and young people” not MUST have.  It would be nice to see the bar raised slightly here.  However, I fear this will not be the case when you see in 5.8 Best Endeavours that educational settings must use “their best endeavours” to make the special educational provision called for”.

“Using their ‘best endeavours’ means that within the resources available to them these bodies must do their best to meet a child or young person’s SEN”

Seriously?  We went from “Support and aspiration: ……. wide-ranging proposals to respond to the frustrations of children and young people, their families and the professionals who work with them” to “do their best”?  Hardly aspirational when one of the main frustrations of children, young people and their families is educational settings not making the special educational provision they or their children need.

5.9 CAMHS

“Some children and young people identified as as having SEN may benefit from referral to special CAMHS for the assessment and treatment of their mental health problems”.  Now this is truly aspirational.  Does the DfE know about the wait lists?  Do they know how many children and young people are turned away as “not meeting the criteria” or because they are assessed as “too severe”?  What about those families?

SNJ7-9The good bits?

The timescales proposed (20 weeks from request of assessment to EHC Plan being provided) are better than the current 26 weeks, as is  the clarity that if a particular service is assessed as being needed (eg from a statutory social care assessment), the provision should be delivered in line with the relevant statutory guidance and should not be delayed until the EHC Plan is complete.

The statement that “the assessment and planning process should be as streamlined as possible” along with “there should be a “tell us once” approach to sharing information” – if any LA can cut down on the number of times a family has to re-tell their story, that will be such a welcome change for families.

“EHC plans should be focused on outcomes (both short term and longer term aspirations)”.  An outcome is not the delivery of support or a service, it is what that support or service is trying to help the child or young person achieve.  So your EHC plan shouldn’t say that as an outcome you will receive Speech and Language Therapy, it should specify what that Speech and Language Therapy should help your child to achieve.

Speech and Language Therapy should be recorded as educational provision unless there are exceptional reasons for not doing so.

There was one thing that stood out for me, as a Lead Trainer for Early Support and that is the omission of the key worker role within the CoP.  Key working is mentioned but only four times and each of those is a reference to something LAs may want to consider.  Having been involved so closely with the Key Working training, it feels very disheartening.  The whole ethos of key working and working in partnership is the very thing that LAs, PCTs and parents need to be using as we move forward.  Having everyone concerned aware of what it means and more importantly, what is looks like in practice is essential to the success of the Children and Families Bill.

Legislation on policies and procedures is about the delivery of the Bill, not an outcome of what the Bill is hoping to achieve.  Let’s hope the final COP is more outcome-focussed.

hands-001As this article is published, Tania & I will be travelling up to meet Mr T.  If anyone thinks that is a daunting thought, then let me also share that I am waving K off  on his first ever school trip away just before I head for the train and that is a much more daunting proposition – as any mum will tell you.

So,  if you’re on the train to Waterloo from Kent on Monday morning, I will be the woman desperately trying to disguise my red-rimmed eyes, probably muttering “he’ll be fine, he’ll have fun” under my breath.

Rough Draft SEN Code of Practice published

SEN Reform imageLate yesterday, the DfE published the “Indicative draft Code of Practice” as a “work in progress” to go with the SEN/D provisions in the Children & families bill, now going through parliament.

The DfE describe the Code of Practice thus:

The SEN Code of Practice is statutory guidance that provides practical advice on how to carry out statutory duties to identify, assess and make provision for children and young people’s SEN as set out in the Children and Families Bill (currently before Parliament).

The Code also sets out how legislation and regulations concerning children and young people with disabilities works alongside this.

The DfE says a subsequent draft for formal consultation will be produced later in 2013. After this, a final draft will undergo Parliamentary scrutiny in time for it to come into force alongside the Children and Families legislation.

This Indicative CoP is a sort of rough draft devised from early pathfinder learning and from the consultation that took place when the earlier versions of the C&F bill were published.

Additionally it published ‘Illustrative Regulations” and an “SEN Evidence Pack” pulling together the information that has informed the Bill.

It just isn’t possible to write an in-depth analysis of an 86 page document and two additional publications here in less than 24 hours. We’ll be bringing you that in the course of the next few weeks.

Debs and I will be busy reading over the weekend, as on Monday, we’ve been invited to meet the Minister, Ed Timpson. I also have a few other great ideas to mention then as well. (I bet he can hardly wait)

So far, I’ve got through more than half the Indicative CoP and so here are some initial points:

References to statutory duties 

The text uses the word MUST to refer to a statutory requirement and SHOULD to refer to guidance which is a non-statutory requirement.

It emphasises the need for a fully engaged Health system through Clinical Commissioning Groups and other health bodies.

Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) and, where responsible for children and young people with SEN, the NHS Commissioning Board, will be full partners in the new arrangements for securing the provision to meet these needs.

This is obviously a great idea, but, judging from what I’m reading in the press about the difficulties CCGs are facing before they’ve even fully launched, one can’t help but feel…uneasy at best.

Parental Involvement

Parents/carers figure heavily in the document, particularly in relation to helping for develop services at a strategic level and on a family level about schools fully involving parents when it comes to how their child will be helped.

Some teachers and indeed, many parents, will find this quite difficult for many reasons and this is why culture change on both sides is vital.

The CoP document talks about Parent-Carer forums and the support and remuneration they need to be fully engaged, although it does not detail what this should be.

Schools and colleges need to ensure that they fully engage parents and young people with SEN when drawing up policies that affect them. Pupil forums should always ensure that there is representation from pupils with SEN. Schools and colleges should also take steps to ensure that parents and young people are actively supported in contributing to assessment, planning and review processes.

The knowledge and understanding that parents have about their child is key information that can help teachers and others to meet their child’s needs. Enabling parents to share their knowledge and engage in positive discussion instils confidence that their contribution is valued and acknowledged.

2.2: Person-centred planning 

A key approach that ensures that parents and carers, children and young people are actively placed at the heart of the system is person centred planning. A person centred approach to planning means that planning should start with the individual (not with services), and take account of their wishes and aspirations, and the support they need to be included and involved in their community. It aims to empower parents, children and young people so that they have more control over assessment and decision-making processes. It enables continual listening and learning, focusing on what is important to someone now and in the future, and acting on this in partnership with their family and their friends.

The integrated arrangements for commissioning services for children and young people with SEN must promote the involvement of children and young people, and their parents, carers and representatives in decisions which relate to their care, and in the development and review of a local offer of services, derived from commissioning plans which reflect the strategic participation of local young people and their families. CCGs will want to engage with Healthwatch organisations, patient representative groups, Parent-Carer forums and other local voluntary organisations and community groups to do this.

Really, will they? As far as I can see, health/patient/parent engagement is at a very nascent stage and in many areas, embryonic or not even a twinkle in the eye.

Let’s be hopeful though. If it’s mandated, they’ll have to at least make an effort. Won’t they?

3.2 Keeping provision under review 

Joint commissioning is an on-going process and local authorities and their partner CCGs must keep the arrangements under review.  Local authorities also have a duty to keep under review the special educational provision and social care provision in their areas for children and young people who have SEN .

This will be a full time job for someone. In Surrey, an SEN Quality Assurance officer has been appointed already and so presumably this will be part of the role’s remit.

Two new Health Liaison Posts?

The document talks “Designated Medical Officer for SEN”.  This person might, apparently, be an employee of an organisation such as a CCG or NHS Trust. They will have responsibility for co-ordinating the role of the health body in statutory assessment and MUST work strategically across health, social care and local government.

They must… have good relations with local commissioners who are partners in the joint arrangements for SEN, working to ensure effectiveness in co-operation, and encouraging and supporting the optimum use of flexibilities for joint working (e.g. through partnership arrangements and pooled budgets).

They must provide a means for the local authority to access expert medical advice – for example, on whether or not a child can attend school, or on medical evidence provided in support of a school application – but may also be required to provide or facilitate access to, advice or support for the health community on SEN, particularly when health services are preparing reports on children. Whilst the advice and support may be provided by a number of health and care professionals as appropriate, the designated medical officer must be an identified, qualified and registered medical practitioner, with the appropriate training and/or experience to exercise this role in relation to children and young people with SEN.

The search had better get underway in LAs and CCGs across the land if they’re to stand a hope of finding such a person and training them in the ways of the different authorities they’re supposed to work across.

Social Care Services Liaison person

Another role is a similar function within social care. Social care teams have a range of duties and responsibilities towards children and young people with SEN.

Social care departments may find it useful to designate an officer or officers to support their social care teams in undertaking these duties and to act as the central point of reference for the local authority’s SEN teams on matters related to social care.

Although ‘may find it useful’ may be taken as meaning, sweep it under the carpet, there’s no money in the pot.

Section 4: Local Offer

There is a long section on the Local Offer of services and the document underlines the point that a “Local Offer’ should not be simply a list of existing services but should be used to improve the local offering for children with SEN/D.

The accompanying Regulations document is aimed at providing a common framework for the local offer. They specify the requirements that all local authorities must meet in developing, publishing and reviewing their local offer:

  • The information to be included

  • How the local offer is to be published

  • Who is to be consulted about the local offer

  • How children and young people with SEN and parents will be involved in the preparation and review of the local offer

  • The publication of comments on the local offer and the local authority’s response

There is a lot of information on the proposed Local Offer and SNJ will talk in more details about this in another post but enough to say at this stage that a ‘common framework’ is still not a ‘minimum standard’

5.6 Additional SEN Support

The big question has been what will replace the School Action & School Action + levels of SEN that are being abolished along with the statement.

The answer is here and it’s called  Additional SEN Support

But, to me, it all seems to depend on:

  1. The strength of the school’s SENCO
  2. The training of staff.

It’s fine to say, as the document does, that all teachers should be teachers of children with special educational needs, but we all know that mainstream teachers are trained to be mainstream teachers and a HUGE programme of extra training is going to be needed if there are not structured levels such as exists at the moment.

The document talks about all the tasks that a SENCO should be carrying out, but when my boys were in mainstream, the SENCO (who was great) was also a year head, class teacher, head of PE and Deputy Head.

In my personal opinion, a SENCO should be just that. A SENCO whose sole duty it is to identify, organise, monitor and review the progress of children with an SEN. They should be listening to those children and, where appropriate, organising nurture groups to support those whose support needs may look like a SEN but may, in fact, stem from an unmet emotional or social need.

Additionally, they should be monitoring the quality of SEN provision from the school’s teachers and be liaising regularly with parents (and it does say that in this document).

It’s a full time job all by itself. And they should be part of the school’s senior management team.

Before providing a child or young person with the Additional SEN Support, a rigorous assessment of SEN should be undertaken by the institution using all available evidence/data sources, such as attainment and historical data, the child or young person’s development in comparison to their peers, information from parents and, if relevant, advice from external support services.

How will this be funded? It will be 1. “agreed locally” and be from “the delegated schools budget”, but early on in the select committees they were talking about clawing back the delegated budget. So what’s it to be?

That’s it for now, we’ll have more next week, when we’ve had time to read it in detail.

You can find the DfE main document page here

You can find the Indicative draft Code of Practice here

You can find the Illustrative Regulations draft here

Please do add your opinions in the comments below or on our SNJ LinkedIn group

Co-production is the key to SEN culture change

Tania writes:

Last week I spoke at a top-level conference for council Chief Executives and Leaders from the SE7 – seven local authorities across the south-east of England.

I was there as part of the Surrey pathfinder, to talk about how parent involvement had become integral to the SEN reform process. Parental participation was demanded by the government and in the Surrey pathfinder, it has become much more than just ‘joining in’.

I’d like to share my short speech with you because I know that we, in Surrey and the SE7, are among those leading the way to culture change for everyone involved in special needs & health and social care provision for children and young people.

I’m not saying Surrey has changed yet at the ‘coalface’, but a change is gonna come…

If all this is new to your school, SENCo and local authority, whether you are a parent or practitioner, please read this. As I said in a post the other day, the DfE wants culture change training to start now. But to coin a phrase – if you’re going to HAVE something different, you have to DO something different.

Let me know what your thoughts are in the comments…

***

My name is Tania Tirraoro, co-chair of Family Voice Surrey. I also run a “Times Top 50” website called Special Needs Jungle that aims to help parents whose children have special needs & disabilities.

I started that website as a direct result of the experiences I had of trying to get statements for my own two sons who have Aspergers and other difficulties. It was adversarial, stressful, frustrating, at times emotional – and we had it easier than many, never having to go to tribunal.

In the five years since then, I have heard so many parents describe horrific – and hugely expensive – experiences of battling to get the help their children need. Of quite disgraceful treatment by local authorities, considering that those parents were only asking for support…

I don’t think it’s unfair to say that parents were viewed by professionals as grasping, demanding and, quite frankly, a bloody nuisance – interfering with their jobs ‘delivering’ services to ‘the client’ (in other words, children)

co-production tree

Click to enlarge. Image from http://www.govint.org

Parents have been left at breaking point, bewildered and angry as to why they should have to fight for what you would think anyone would want for any child – the right support provided in a timely manner.

You might look at me and think I’m one of the “sharp elbowed middle-classes” the right-wing press like to sneer at. But that’s not where I came from and I’m in this to help those parents be heard, who don’t even know they’re allowed to have a voice.

So. Here we are. The government decided enough was enough. Things had to change – and what was more, parents were mandated to be a part of it. Imagine that. I can only guess at the gasps of horror from SEN departments across the land.

But, I have to say, and I know Susie [Campbell, Surrey’s Pathfinder Manager] will agree that- in Surrey at least–  the sky did not fall in on County Hall and it’s all working out quite nicely so far.

From a starting point of mutual suspicion that has taken time to overcome, we’ve worked to build up a relationship that has steadily improved – because we wanted it to work.

We now operate what we’re calling co-production – working together as equal partners – this is a revolution in thinking and really, it’s as it should be!

Parents representatives sit on every workstream of the pathfinder and on the Local Change Board.

I have seen guards come down over time and views shared in a measured and respectful way –  but of course it hasn’t all been plain sailing – as in any sphere, it can depend on individual personalities and it’s up to everyone to make sure this is managed.

On the whole, parents have discovered that practitioners don’t have horns and practitioners have discovered that parents have valuable insights that they may not have previously considered. This can only be for the benefit of who this process is all about – the child.

There is still a long way to go with: culture change for many within local authorities and with confidence for parents outside the pathfinder – there’s no magic wand.

But the genie is out of the bottle and when the pathfinder is over, parents aren’t going to away quietly and those with whom I work within Surrey don’t want them to – and neither does the government. We’re already involved in other work for example the Disabilities Expert Group and Gap Analysis for SEN provision.

This is going to be the new normal – But – and this is a big but – it needs to be sustainable.

Parents came into this as hopeful and willing volunteers, but now that the benefits have been realised and we are working as co-producers, local and national government need to look to how they can support the continued involvement of parents as we ALL work together to improve outcomes for children and young people with SEN & disabilities.

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So – what’s your opinion of the reforms?

And – if you’re in Surrey, see this link for our upcoming conference on the SEN & health changes

Government acts on calls for SEN ‘duty’ for health provision in reforms

senreform3The surprising and extremely welcome news today from the Department for Education (DfE) is that there will, after all, be a legal duty on health providers to deliver the provision detailed in the health part of the Education, Health and Care Plan that’s currently being developed under the SEN reforms.

Clinical Commissioning Groups are GP groups who, under the new health changes, will plan local health services and who will be called on to organise the health requirements of an EHCP, including specialist services such as physiotherapy, and speech and language therapy.

Since the first draft legislation was published for the Children and Families Bill, parents, charities, SEN legal experts and local authorities themselves have been expressing concern that there was no duty on health to provide the services in the EHCPs. There was only a duty to “jointly commission” – the ‘abracadabra approach’ – which everyone knew was never going to be enough.

The government has bowed to this weight of expert opinion and today, in a press statement, the SEN Minister, Edward Timpson said,

“We are putting health at the centre of our reforms in bringing in this legal duty. It is a significant step forward for children and young adults with special educational needs, and I know that many parents will welcome it.

The duty will mean that parents, and children and young adults with complex special educational needs, will get the health services that are right for them.”

Christine Lenehan, Director of the Council for Disabled Children said,

“Many children and young adults with special educational needs depend on health services. I am really pleased that their needs are being taken seriously. This legal duty should help to improve their lives.”

However, Health Minister Dr Dan Poulter said:

“We are determined that children and young people should be put at the heart of the new health and social care system. That is why we and many other organisations with the power to make a difference recently pledged to do everything possible to improve children’s health. This is an example of that pledge becoming a reality.”

disability sDr Poulter is the only one who does not make the specification “with special educational needs”. He instead refers to the recent pledge “Better Health Outcomes for Children and Young People

A quarter of all children with disability do NOT have special educational needs but do have significant health needs. They will not be covered under this announcement under the current way the Children and Families bill is worded.

Views on health from the House of Commons Children & families Bill Committee

In today’s HOC Children & Families Bill committee hearing, Srabani Sen, chief executive of Contact A Family, said that including disabled children has the potential to cost less to provide provision because it will be more coordinated and simplified. She said that this is where working with parent-carer forums is beneficial because by involving parents at a strategic level designing services you end up with better targetted services.

In her evidence, IPSEA chief executive, Jane McConnell acknowledged the work that had gone into bringing about a duty on health as it had been previously said it wouldn’t be possible. However, she went on to say that that although now it seemed there would be an Education & Health plan, if put under scrutiy by the Trades Description Act, the proposed EHCP would fail because there is still not a duty on social care.

Mrs McConnell said that this should not be a big step as social care is administered from within the local authority, so it should not be as big a challenge to achieve. If there is, she said, a single entrance into the plan then there should be a a single path to redress.

Mrs McConnell explained that she had been told that the current Tribunal already has the expertise to oversee all three strands of a plan in a dispute over provision so it should be given the power to do just that. Otherwise, there would be a reliance on parents to go to three different points for redress, which, if it is a single plan, does not make sense.

So, a huge step forward, acknowledged on all sides but:

1. Still no duty on social care

2. Still no inclusion of children with disabilities who do not have special educational needs.

What do you think?

Read about today’s other developments in SEN reform – Pathfinder update and champions named, as well as more views from the HOC Children & Families Bill committee

SEN reform progress report: ‘pathfinder champions’ chosen

senreform4It’s been a bumper day of announcements and happenings surrounding SEN reform.

First of all, came the publication of a list of local authority groups who have been appointed “pathfinder champions” as they plan to implement the reform to special needs provision in England.

At the same time, a joint report on progress across the pathfinder programme, was published, including headline results from a survey of 65 families with completed education health and care plans. The report is available for download from the associated resources section of this page.

But, quite unexpectedly, the DfE announced a much called for duty on clinical commissioning groups (GPs who plan local health services) to secure any health provision required in the upcoming education, health and care plans for children and young adults up to 25.

Hard on the heels came the House of Commons Children’s & Families Bill committee meeting with a stellar cast of speakers that anyone knowledgeable about the SEN world will be familiar with.

Wow! This is too much information for one post, so Debs and I have prepared TWO posts, one about the new duty and one about the first two points.

Read the “New Duty on Health” post here. (The link will be repeated at the end of this post)

Progress Report & HOC Committee

The progress report and headline survey results is a largely upbeat document about, surprise surprise, progress made. It does seem that, as you would expect, the smaller, more compact authorities are further along in some areas where reorganising services is a more straightforward.

The report, while interesting and informative, does rather over-focus on the positive aspects of various pathfinders and while this is to be expected, highlighting particular achievements, it would be useful to see what isn’t working quite so well and where some of the larger challenges such as the scale of work needed to provide the Local Offer and its necessary IT framework mentioned.

It was, however, gratifying that they mention the parent-carer involvement of the SE7 because, certainly in Surrey and Kent, we do feel this is of particular note. You can read the document in full here

In fact during the House of Commons Children’s & families Bill committee hearing in Westminster today, Christine Lenehan of the Council for Disabled Children noted that, as she visited the various pathfinders, she found that some of most effective ones are the not those with the most plans but those that have concentrated on building climate for culture change to happen.

This, Mrs Lenehan emphasised, will be essential otherwise people will just be focusing on scaling up the pathfinders rather than looking at how you make an entire system change and so that it helps individuals in the system.

Mrs Lenehan said that true success was working with empowered parents, empowered young people and being able to bring creativity to some systems that have struggled to be creative, because there are far too many professionals who do what they do because it’s the way they have always done things. She noted that in her experience some professionals happily seemed to admit that their jobs would be far easier without the interference of parents!

Brian Lamb, the author of The Lamb Inquiry in 2009 and who spearheads Achievement for All said during the select committee that, “Essentially the more you involve parents both at school level and the strategic level, the better the outcomes you get.”

He welcomed the concept of the Local Offer of services for SEN/D in terms of what the government has painted as the picture around it, rather than the language that now exists in the actual bill.

Pathfinder champions named

From April 2013, the ‘pathfinder champions’ will begin to support councils who local authorities across England who are not involved in the pathfinder as they prepare to roll out the reforms.

The DfE says that the champions were chosen based on a mix of skills, experience and regional factors. Each region will have its own pathfinder champion but in some areas, the role will be carried out by a partnership of pathfinder local authority areas.

The pathfinders are:

London Bromley & Bexley
South East SE7 (consortium of seven LAs) and Southampton
South West Wiltshire
North East Hartlepool
East Midlands Leicester City
East of England Hertfordshire
West Midlands Solihull
Yorkshire & Humber North Yorkshire & Calderdale
North West Greater Manchester Group (Wigan, Trafford and Manchester)

The SE7 consortium consists of Surrey, Kent, West Sussex, East Sussex, Hampshire, Medway and Brighton & Hove. Obviously with Surrey and Kent being our own areas, we are both very pleased that the SE7 has been designated.

The champions cover a broad range of authority types. In some city-based authorities, it is a very different system where, for example there may only be one new health Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) whereas for example in Surrey there are 5.5 (half of the .5 is in Hampshire) and so coordinating provision will be much more complicated. In addition, in Surrey the SEN department is divided into are four geographic sub-quadrants as it is such a big county and I’m sure this isn’t the only LA that will face such complications.

The work of the pathfinder champions will be informed by a set of ‘principles of emerging practice’. There will be an updated version of this document on the pathfinder website from the end of March. Translated, ‘principles of emerging practice’ are ways that those involved with the reforms have found to be the most effective and practical steps to implement the reforms.

Two further SQW evaluation reports will be published at the end of May and September. The first of these will include further progress made, feedback from 10 case study areas and a final update about the SEN Direct Payments Pilot Programme.

Read the post on SNJ about the new duty to provide health provisions in an EHCP here with responses on it from the SEN Select Committee hearing

You can watch the replay of the HOC C&F committee from 5th March 2013 here

Not: As we publish, the committee is still going on, but for our purposes, most of what we needed to hear has been said. If anything else interesting is said after 5pm, we’ll update.

DfE publishes an easy-to-read version of Children and Families Bill

bill-YPversionThe Department for Education has published an easy to read version of the children & families bill designed especially for young people.

The guide uses a simplified layout and language which, as the changes are supposed to cover young people with SEN and disabilities up to the age of 25, is a very good idea.

The actual bill contains lots of clauses and sub-clauses and referrals to clauses stated a few paragraphs previously and so even if the language within it isn’t too difficult, you can get a headache just working out which bit each paragraph is referring to.

I actually have a sneaky feeling lots of adults will be reading this version as well – let’s face it, unless you have a lot of time to pore over it, something that lays out the changes in basic terms is of great benefit.

It also means that adults working with young people who want to understand what’s in the bill can read it along with them without having to find ways to interpret a complicated text.

You can find the DfE webpage that has the download link here

If you’re feeling up for a bit (lot) more of a challenge, read the bill in full here.